European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 110, Issue 1, pp 91–97

Correlation between single-slice muscle anatomical cross-sectional area and muscle volume in thigh extensors, flexors and adductors of perimenopausal women

  • S. Cotofana
  • M. Hudelmaier
  • W. Wirth
  • M. Himmer
  • S. Ring-Dimitriou
  • A. M. Sänger
  • F. Eckstein
Original Article

Abstract

Quantitative data on muscle volume (MV) are important for estimating maximal muscle power. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between anatomical cross-sectional areas (ACSAs) and the MV in thigh muscles (extensors, flexors, adductors, and sartorius) in perimenopausal women, and to identify at which proximal-to-distal level a single-slice ACSA measurement with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) displays the highest correlation in each of these. Axial MRIs of the thigh were acquired in 41 perimenopausal women aged 50.8 ± 3.2 years. Segmentation of the extensors, flexors, adductors, and the sartorius was performed between the femoral neck (0%) and the distal end of the intermediate vastus (100%). MVs were determined by numerical integration, and the ACSA was calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions at 10% intervals from proximal to distal. The extensors contributed 50%, the flexors 19%, the adductors 28%, and the sartorius 3% of the total thigh MV. Maximal correlations between ACSA and MV were observed at the 20–40% proximal-to-distal level in the extensors (R2 = 0.73), at 30% in the adductors (R2 = 0.82), and at 70% in the flexors (R2 = 0.72) and sartorius (R2 = 0.85), respectively. ACSA at 50% displayed the highest overall correlations (R2 ≥ 0.69) with MV for all muscle groups. Single-slice ACSAs from MRI displayed high correlations with MVs. Although the (proximal to distal) measurement locations with the highest correlation varied between the muscle groups, a single slice at the 50% location achieved the best compromise in terms of correlation between ACSA and MV across extensors, flexors, adductors and the sartorius.

Keywords

MR imaging Anatomical cross-sectional area Muscle volume 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Cotofana
    • 1
  • M. Hudelmaier
    • 1
  • W. Wirth
    • 1
  • M. Himmer
    • 2
  • S. Ring-Dimitriou
    • 3
  • A. M. Sänger
    • 4
  • F. Eckstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal ResearchParacelsus Private Medical UniversitySalzburgAustria
  2. 2.Institute of Radiology, CDKPMUSalzburgAustria
  3. 3.Department of Sport Science and KinesiologyUniversity of SalzburgSalzburgAustria
  4. 4.Department of Organismic BiologyUniversity of SalzburgSalzburgAustria

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