The endothelial microparticle response to a high fat meal is not attenuated by prior exercise

  • Michael Harrison
  • Ronan P. Murphy
  • Paul L. O’Connor
  • Donal J. O’Gorman
  • Noel McCaffrey
  • Philip M. Cummins
  • Niall M. Moyna
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-009-1050-5

Cite this article as:
Harrison, M., Murphy, R.P., O’Connor, P.L. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (2009) 106: 555. doi:10.1007/s00421-009-1050-5

Abstract

Triglyceride-rich postprandial lipoproteins are known to activate endothelial cells in vitro, contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial microparticles (EMP) are membranous vesicles released into the circulation from vascular endothelial cells that permit cell activation to be monitored in vivo. The objective of the study was to examine changes in EMP following a high fat meal, consumed with and without prior exercise. Eight recreationally active young men underwent two oral fat tolerance tests following either 100 min exercise at 70% VO2peak (EX trial) or no exercise (CON trial) on the previous evening. Postprandial triglycerides were reduced (1.97 ± 0.31 vs. 1.17 ± 0.13 mmol L−1, p < 0.05) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) increased (1.20 ± 0.07 vs. 1.30 ± 0.08 mmol L−1, p < 0.05) in the EX compared to CON trial. EMP (CD31+/42b−) increased postprandially (p < 0.05). However, counts were not different between trials (postprandial CON and EX trial counts × 10μL−1, 3.10 ± 0.14 vs. 3.26 ± 0.37). There were no changes in sICAM-1 or sVCAM-1 postprandially and no differences between trials. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and leukocytes increased postprandially (p < 0.05). IL-6 values were not different between trials. Leukocytes were higher at 0 h in the EX trial with CON and EX trial values similar at 6 h. EMP, but not sICAM-1 or sVCAM-1, increase in response to a high fat meal. However, EMP are not attenuated by acute exercise, despite a considerable reduction in postprandial lipemia and an increase in HDL-C.

Keywords

Endothelial activation Postprandial lipemia Adhesion molecules Acute exercise 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Harrison
    • 1
  • Ronan P. Murphy
    • 2
  • Paul L. O’Connor
    • 2
  • Donal J. O’Gorman
    • 2
  • Noel McCaffrey
    • 2
  • Philip M. Cummins
    • 2
  • Niall M. Moyna
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health, Sport and Exercise ScienceWaterford Institute of TechnologyWaterfordIreland
  2. 2.School of Health and Human PerformanceDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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