European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 106, Issue 2, pp 297–303 | Cite as

Inspiratory resistive loading after all-out exercise improves subsequent performance

  • Gaspar R. Chiappa
  • Jorge P. Ribeiro
  • Cristiano N. Alves
  • Paulo J. C. Vieira
  • João Dubas
  • Fernando QueirogaJr
  • Laura D. Batista
  • Antonio C. Silva
  • J. Alberto Neder
Original Article

Abstract

We have previously shown that post-exercise inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) reduces blood lactate ([Lacb]). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IRL during recovery could improve subsequent exercise performance. Eight healthy men underwent, on different days, two sequential 30-s, cycle ergometer Wingate tests. During the 10-min recovery period from test 1, subjects breathed freely or through an inspiratory resistance (15 cm H2O) with passive leg recovery. Arterialized [Lacb] values, perceptual scores (Borg), cardiac output by impedance cardiography (QT), and changes in the deoxygenation status of the M. vastus lateralis by near-infrared spectroscopy (ΔHHb), were recorded. [Lacb] was significantly reduced after 4 min of recovery with IRL (peak [Lacb] 12.5 ± 2.3 mmol l−1 with free-breathing vs. 9.8 ± 1.5 mmol l−1 with IRL). Effort perception was reduced during late recovery with IRL compared with free-breathing. Cardiac work was increased with IRL, since heart rate and QT were elevated during late recovery. Peripheral muscle reoxygenation, however, was significantly impaired with IRL, suggesting that post-exercise convective O2 delivery to the lower limbs was reduced. Importantly, IRL had a dual effect on subsequent performance, i.e., improvement in peak and mean power, but increased fatigue index (P < 0.05). Our data demonstrate that IRL after a Wingate test reduces post-exercise effort perception and improves peak power on subsequent all-out maximal-intensity exercise.

Keywords

Respiratory muscles Wingate test Hemodynamics Near-infrared spectroscopy Lactate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gaspar R. Chiappa
    • 1
  • Jorge P. Ribeiro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cristiano N. Alves
    • 1
  • Paulo J. C. Vieira
    • 1
  • João Dubas
    • 3
  • Fernando QueirogaJr
    • 3
  • Laura D. Batista
    • 3
  • Antonio C. Silva
    • 4
  • J. Alberto Neder
    • 3
  1. 1.Exercise Pathophysiology Research Laboratory, Cardiology DivisionHospital de Clinicas de Porto AlegrePorto AlegreBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Faculty of MedicineFederal University of Rio Grande SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  3. 3.Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Function and Clinical Exercise Physiology Unit (SEFICE)Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)São PauloBrazil
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologyFederal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)São PauloBrazil

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