European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 102, Issue 2, pp 223–231 | Cite as

Creatine supplementation improves muscular performance in older women

  • Lincoln A. Gotshalk
  • William J. Kraemer
  • Mario A. G. Mendonca
  • Jakob L. Vingren
  • Anne M. Kenny
  • Barry A. Spiering
  • Disa L. Hatfield
  • Maren S. Fragala
  • Jeff S. Volek
Original Article

Abstract

Muscle power and strength decrease with age leading to reduced independence and increased health risk from falls. Creatine supplementation can increase muscle power and strength. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 7 days of creatine supplementation on body composition, muscular strength, and lower-body motor functional performance in older women. Thirty 58–71 year old women performed three test sessions (T1–T3) each separated by one week. Each session consisted of one repetition maximum tests for bench press and leg press, and isometric hand-grip, tandem gait, upper-body ergometer, and lower-body ergometer tests. Following T2, subjects were assigned to a creatine monohydrate (0.3 g kg body mass−1 for 7 days) (CR: 63.31 ± 1.22 year, 160.00 ± 1.58 cm, 67.11 ± 4.38 kg) or a placebo (PL: 62.98 ± 1.11 year, 162.25 ± 2.09 cm, 67.84 ± 3.90 kg) supplementation group. CR significantly (< 0.05) increased bench press (1.7 ± 0.4 kg), leg press (5.2 ± 1.8 kg), body mass (0.49 ± 0.04 kg) and fat free mass (0.52 ± 0.05) and decreased completion time on the functional tandem gait tests from T2–T3. No significant changes were found for PL on any of the measured variables. No adverse side-effects were reported by either group. Short-term creatine supplementation resulted in an increase in strength, power, and lower-body motor functional performance in older women without any adverse side effects

Keywords

Aging Strength Power Creatine monohydrate Ergogenics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Keoki Weaver, Amber Goodloe, and Sarah Steele, members of the Laboratory for Exercise Science at the University of Hawaii at Hilo for their great help in the familiarization and testing protocols. The cooperation of a dedicated group of subjects was greatly appreciated.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lincoln A. Gotshalk
    • 1
  • William J. Kraemer
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mario A. G. Mendonca
    • 1
  • Jakob L. Vingren
    • 2
  • Anne M. Kenny
    • 3
  • Barry A. Spiering
    • 2
  • Disa L. Hatfield
    • 2
  • Maren S. Fragala
    • 2
  • Jeff S. Volek
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health and Physical EducationUniversity of Hawaii at HiloHiloUSA
  2. 2.Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Unit 1110The University of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  3. 3.Center on AgingUniversity of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA

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