European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 100, Issue 4, pp 479–485 | Cite as

Physiological characteristics of badminton match play

  • Oliver Faude
  • Tim Meyer
  • Friederike Rosenberger
  • Markus Fries
  • Günther Huber
  • Wilfried Kindermann
Original Article

Abstract

The present study aimed at examining the physiological characteristics and metabolic demands of badminton single match play. Twelve internationally ranked badminton players (eight women and four men) performed an incremental treadmill test [VO2peak = 50.3 ± 4.1 ml min−1 kg−1 (women) and 61.8 ± 5.9 ml min−1 kg−1 (men), respectively]. On a separate day, they played a simulated badminton match of two 15 min with simultaneous gas exchange (breath-by-breath) and heart rate measurements. Additionally, blood lactate concentrations were determined before, after 15 min and at the end of the match. Furthermore, the duration of rallies and rests in between, the score as well as the number of shots per rally were recorded. A total of 630 rallies was analysed. Mean rally and rest duration were 5.5 ± 4.4 s and 11.4 ± 6.0 s, respectively, with an average 5.1 ± 3.9 shots played per rally. Mean oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and blood lactate concentrations during badminton matches were 39.6 ± 5.7 ml min−1 kg−1 (73.3% VO2peak), 169 ± 9 min−1 (89.0% HRpeak) and 1.9 ± 0.7 mmol l−1, respectively. For a single subject 95% confidence intervals for VO2 and HR during match play were on average 45.7–100.9% VO2peak and 78.3–99.8% HRpeak. High average intensity of badminton match play and considerable variability of several physiological variables demonstrate the importance of anaerobic alactacid and aerobic energy production in competitive badminton. A well-developed aerobic endurance capacity seems necessary for fast recovery between rallies or intensive training workouts.

Keywords

Metabolic profile Energy metabolism Racquet sports Ambulatory spirometry Intermittent exercise 

References

  1. Buchfuhrer MJ, Hansen JE, Robinson TE, Sue DY, Wasserman K, Whipp BJ (1983) Optimizing the exercise protocol for cardiopulmonary assessment. J Appl Physiol 55:1558–1564PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Cabello Manrique D, Gonzalez-Badillo JJ (2003) Analysis of the characteristics of competitive badminton. Br J Sports Med 37:62–66PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Christmass MA, Dawson B, Passeretto P, Arthur PG (1999) A comparison of skeletal muscle oxygenation and fuel use in sustained continuous and intermittent exercise. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 80:423–435PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Costill D (1970) Metabolic responses during distance running. J Appl Physiol 28:251–255PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Docherty D (1982) A comparison of heart rate responses in racquet games. Br J Sports Med 16:96–100PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Faccini P, Dal Monte A (1996) Physiologic demands of badminton match play. Am J Sports Med 24:S64–S66PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Ferrauti A, Bergeron MF, Pluim BM, Weber K (2001) Physiological responses in tennis and running with similar oxygen uptake. Eur J Appl Physiol 85:27–33PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ferrauti A, Giesen HT, Merheim G, Weber K (2006) Indirect calorimetry in a soccer game. Dtsch Z Sportmed 57:142–146Google Scholar
  9. Ghosh AK, Goswami A, Ahuja A (1993) Evaluation of a sports specific training programme in badminton players. Indian J Med Res 98:232–236PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Glaister M (2005) Multiple sprint work: physiological responses, mechanisms of fatigue and the influence of aerobic fitness. Sports Med 35:757–777PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hagerman FC, Lawrence RA, Mansfield MC (1988) A comparison of energy expenditure during rowing and cycling ergometry. Med Sci Sports Exerc 20:479–488PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Jeukendrup AE, Wallis GA (2005) Measurement of substrate oxidation during exercise by means of gas exchange measurements. Int J Sports Med 26(Suppl 1):S28–S37PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lewis DA, Kamon E, Hodgson JL (1986) Physiological differences between genders. Implications for sports conditioning. Sports Med 3:357–369PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Majumdar P, Khanna GL, Malik V, Sachdeva S, Arif M, Mandal M (1997) Physiological analysis to quantify training load in badminton. Br J Sports Med 31:342–345PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Meyer T, Davison RC, Kindermann W (2005) Ambulatory gas exchange measurements—current status and future options. Int J Sports Med 26(Suppl 1):S19–S27PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Miao SK, Wang SW (1988) The measurement of aerobic, anaerobic capacity and extremital strength of Chinese top badminton players. Abstr New Horiz Hum Mov 3:252Google Scholar
  17. Reilly T, Ball D (1984) The net physiological cost of dribbling a soccer ball. Res Q Exerc Sport 55:267–271Google Scholar
  18. Roecker K, Prettin S, Sorichter S (2005) Gas exchange measurements with high temporal resolution: the breath-by-breath approach. Int J Sports Med 26(Suppl 1):S11–S18PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Roepstorff C, Steffensen CH, Madsen M, Stallknecht B, Kanstrup IL, Richter EA, Kiens B (2002) Gender differences in substrate utilization during submaximal exercise in endurance-trained subjects. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 282:E435–E447PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Sheel AW, Richards JC, Foster GE, Guenette JA (2004) Sex differences in respiratory exercise physiology. Sports Med 34:567–579PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Smekal G, von Duvillard SP, Rihacek C, Pokan R, Hofmann P, Baron R, Tschan H, Bachl N (2001) A physiological profile of tennis match play. Med Sci Sports Exerc 33:999–1005PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Stolen T, Chamari K, Castagna C, Wisloff U (2005) Physiology of soccer: an update. Sports Med 35:501–536PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Tomlin DL, Wenger HA (2001) The relationship between aerobic fitness and recovery from high intensity intermittent exercise. Sports Med 31:1–11PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Weiler B, Urhausen A, Coen B, Weiler S, Huber G, Kindermann W (1997) Sportmedizinische Leistungsdiagnostik (allgemeine Laufausdauer und Sprintvermögen) und Streßhormon-Messungen im Wettkampf bei Badmintonspielern der nationalen und internationalen Spitzenklasse. Sportorthopädie Sporttraumatologie 13:5–12Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Faude
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tim Meyer
    • 1
    • 4
  • Friederike Rosenberger
    • 1
  • Markus Fries
    • 1
    • 2
  • Günther Huber
    • 3
  • Wilfried Kindermann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Clinical MedicineUniversity of SaarlandSaarbrückenGermany
  2. 2.Olympic Training Center Rheinland-Pfalz/SaarlandSaarbrückenGermany
  3. 3.Badminton World Training CenterSaarbrückenGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Sports MedicineUniversity PaderbornPaderbornGermany

Personalised recommendations