European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 100, Issue 3, pp 275–285

Hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to the restriction of femoral blood flow by KAATSU in healthy subjects

  • Haruko Iida
  • Miwa Kurano
  • Haruhito Takano
  • Nami Kubota
  • Toshihiro Morita
  • Kentaro Meguro
  • Yoshiaki Sato
  • Takashi Abe
  • Yoshihisa Yamazaki
  • Kansei Uno
  • Katsu Takenaka
  • Ken Hirose
  • Toshiaki Nakajima
Original Article

Abstract

The application of an orthostatic stress such as lower body negative pressure (LBNP) has been proposed to minimize the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system and subsequently to reduce the cardiovascular deconditioning. The KAATSU training is a novel method to induce muscle strength and hypertrophy with blood pooling in capacitance vessels by restricting venous return. Here, we studied the hemodynamic, autonomic nervous and hormonal responses to the restriction of femoral blood flow by KAATSU in healthy male subjects, using the ultrasonography and impedance cardiography. The pressurization on both thighs induced pooling of blood into the legs with pressure-dependent reduction of femoral arterial blood flow. The application of 200 mmHg KAATSU significantly decreased left ventricular diastolic dimension (LVDd), cardiac output (CO) and diameter of inferior vena cava (IVC). Similarly, 200 mmHg KAATSU also decreased stroke volume (SV), which was almost equal to the value in standing. Heart rate (HR) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) increased in a similar manner to standing with slight change of mean blood pressure (mBP). High-frequency power (HFRR) decreased during both 200 mmHg KAATSU and standing, while low-frequency/high-frequency power (LFRR/HFRR) increased significantly. During KAATSU and standing, the concentration of noradrenaline (NA) and vasopressin (ADH) and plasma renin activity (PRA) increased. These results indicate that KAATSU in supine subjects reproduces the effects of standing on HR, SV, TPR, etc., thus stimulating an orthostatic stimulus. And, KAATSU training appears to be a useful method for potential countermeasure like LBNP against orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

Keywords

KAATSU training Hemodynamics Autonomic function Spaceflight Cardiovascular deconditioning 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haruko Iida
    • 1
  • Miwa Kurano
    • 1
  • Haruhito Takano
    • 1
  • Nami Kubota
    • 1
  • Toshihiro Morita
    • 2
  • Kentaro Meguro
    • 2
  • Yoshiaki Sato
    • 1
  • Takashi Abe
    • 3
  • Yoshihisa Yamazaki
    • 4
  • Kansei Uno
    • 5
  • Katsu Takenaka
    • 2
  • Ken Hirose
    • 6
  • Toshiaki Nakajima
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ischemic Circulatory Physiology, KAATSU TrainingThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Cardiovascular MedicineThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier ScienceThe University of TokyoChibaJapan
  4. 4.Japan Manned Space Systems CorporationIbarakiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive MedicineThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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