European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 100, Issue 2, pp 235–239 | Cite as

Increased oxidative stress indices in the blood of child swimmers

  • Sofia Gougoura
  • Michalis G. Nikolaidis
  • Iason A. Kostaropoulos
  • Athanasios Z. Jamurtas
  • Georgios Koukoulis
  • Dimitris Kouretas
Short Communication

Abstract

The blood redox status of child athletes is compared with that of age-matched untrained individuals. In the present study, 17 swimmers (10.1 ± 1.6 years) and 12 non-athletes (9.9 ± 1.1 years) participated. Reduced glutathione (GSH) was lower by 37% in swimmers compared to non-athletes (P < 0.01), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was not different and their ratio (GSH/GSSG) was lower by 43% in swimmers compared to non-athletes (P < 0.01). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances concentration was higher by 25% in swimmers compared to controls. Catalase exhibited a strong trend toward lower levels in swimmers (P = 0.08). Finally, total antioxidant capacity was found lower by 28% in swimmers compared to controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we report that children participating in swimming training exhibit increased oxidative stress and less antioxidant capacity compared to untrained counterparts and suggest that children may be more susceptible to oxidative stress induced by chronic exercise.

Keywords

Free radicals Lipid peroxidation Reactive oxygen species TAC TBARS 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sofia Gougoura
    • 1
  • Michalis G. Nikolaidis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Iason A. Kostaropoulos
    • 1
  • Athanasios Z. Jamurtas
    • 2
    • 3
  • Georgios Koukoulis
    • 4
  • Dimitris Kouretas
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and BiotechnologyUniversity of ThessalyLarissaGreece
  2. 2.Department of Physical Education and Sport SciencesUniversity of ThessalyTrikalaGreece
  3. 3.Institute of Human Performance and RehabilitationCentre for Research and Technology Thessaly (CERETETH)TrikalaGreece
  4. 4.School of MedicineUniversity of ThessalyLarissaGreece

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