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European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 98, Issue 6, pp 525–534 | Cite as

Changes in markers of muscle damage, inflammation and HSP70 after an Ironman triathlon race

  • Katsuhiko SuzukiEmail author
  • Jonathan Peake
  • Kazunori Nosaka
  • Mitsuharu Okutsu
  • Chris R. Abbiss
  • Rob Surriano
  • David Bishop
  • Marc J. Quod
  • Hamilton Lee
  • David T. Martin
  • Paul B. Laursen
Original Article

Abstract

We investigated the effects of an Ironman triathlon race on markers of muscle damage, inflammation and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Nine well-trained male triathletes (mean ± SD age 34 ± 5 years;O2peak 66.4 ml kg−1 min−1) participated in the 2004 Western Australia Ironman triathlon race (3.8 km swim, 180 km cycle, 42.2 km run). We assessed jump height, muscle strength and soreness, and collected venous blood samples 2 days before the race, within 30 min and 14–20 h after the race. Plasma samples were analysed for muscle proteins, acute phase proteins, cytokines, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and clinical biochemical variables related to dehydration, haemolysis, liver and renal functions. Muscular strength and jump height decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after the race, whereas muscle soreness and the plasma concentrations of muscle proteins increased. The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6 and IL-10, and HSP70 increased markedly after the race, while IL-12p40 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were also elevated. IL-4, IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α did not change significantly, despite elevated C-reactive protein and serum amyloid protein A on the day after the race. Plasma creatinine, uric acid and total bilirubin concentrations and γ-glutamyl transferase activity also changed after the race. In conclusion, despite evidence of muscle damage and an acute phase response after the race, the pro-inflammatory cytokine response was minimal and anti-inflammatory cytokines were induced. HSP70 is released into the circulation as a function of exercise duration.

Keywords

Ultraendurance exercise Acute phase proteins Cytokines Heat shock protein 70 Systemic stress 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was carried out in the Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care and partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (A) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan (no. 17680047). Some of these data were presented at the seventh symposium of the International Society of Exercise and Immunology held in Monaco in September 2005. At the time that this study was conducted, Jonathan Peake was a recipient of a postdoctoral fellowship from the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsuhiko Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Jonathan Peake
    • 1
  • Kazunori Nosaka
    • 3
  • Mitsuharu Okutsu
    • 2
  • Chris R. Abbiss
    • 3
  • Rob Surriano
    • 4
  • David Bishop
    • 4
  • Marc J. Quod
    • 5
  • Hamilton Lee
    • 5
  • David T. Martin
    • 5
  • Paul B. Laursen
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Human SciencesWaseda UniversityTokorozawaJapan
  2. 2.Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical CareWaseda UniversityTokorozawaJapan
  3. 3.School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health SciencesEdith Cowan UniversityJoondalupAustralia
  4. 4.School of Human Movement and Exercise ScienceUniversity of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia
  5. 5.Department of PhysiologyAustralian Institute of SportCanberraAustralia

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