European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 96, Issue 3, pp 315–321

Minor changes in blood lipids after 6 weeks of high-volume low- intensity physical activity with strict energy balance control

  • Stefan Branth
  • Anders Sjödin
  • Anders Forslund
  • Leif Hambraeus
  • Ulf Holmbäck
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-005-0096-2

Cite this article as:
Branth, S., Sjödin, A., Forslund, A. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (2006) 96: 315. doi:10.1007/s00421-005-0096-2

Abstract

Physical activity has been shown to favorably affect metabolic risk markers, including blood lipids. The impact of high-energy turnover, without influencing the traditionally used markers of exercise training effects, on blood lipids is still unclear. The aim was to study the effect of high-volume low-intensity physical activity on the blood lipid pattern, with a tight control of diet and energy balance. Eight untrained men [42.5 (12.1) years, body mass index 24.2 (2.8) kg m−2] were tested in two different 6-week protocols. In the sedentary protocol, the subjects were instructed to limit their everyday physical activity. In the activity protocol, a 2-h physical activity bout was performed 5 days week−1 (~40% of VO2max; equivalent of an additional 21 MJ week−1 in energy expenditure). The diet for both protocols comprised ~40 energy percent (E%) fat, ~50 E% carbohydrates (CHO). The polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids ratio of the diet was ~0.12. There were no changes during each 6-week period or differences between the two protocols in body weight, body composition or aerobic capacity. Low-intensity physical activity did not affect lipid parameters substantially, except for a slightly lower Apo-B/Apo-A1 ratio with the activity protocol (P<0.05). Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as Apo-B and Apo-A1, were increased during the beginning of each 6-week period (P<0.05), but returned to basal levels by the sixth week. In conclusion, 6 weeks of high-volume low-intensity physical activity did not affect blood lipids substantially.

Keywords

Exercise volume Energy turnover Cholesterol 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Branth
    • 1
  • Anders Sjödin
    • 1
  • Anders Forslund
    • 1
    • 3
  • Leif Hambraeus
    • 1
    • 4
  • Ulf Holmbäck
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Public Health and Caring SciencesClinical Nutrition and Metabolism Uppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Department of Medicine - Endo section; MC 1027University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, PediatricsUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  4. 4.The Unit for Preventive Nutrition Department of BiosciencesNovum Karolinska InstituteHuddingeSweden

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