European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 90, Issue 5–6, pp 595–600

The effects of 11 weeks whole body vibration training on jump height, contractile properties and activation of human knee extensors

  • C. J. de Ruiter
  • S. M. van Raak
  • J. V. Schilperoort
  • A. P. Hollander
  • A. de Haan
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether 11 weeks of whole body vibration (WBV) training applied in a way that is commonly seen in practice, i.e. without additional loads, would improve muscle activation and/or contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles and counter movement jump height in healthy subjects. Ten subjects belonging to the experimental group trained three times a week and stood bare-foot with a 110 ° knee angle on a vibration platform (30 Hz, 8 mm amplitude). They underwent five to eight sets of 1-min vibration with 1 min rest in between. Ten control subjects followed the same training programme but stood (110 ° knee angle) beside the platform. Before, during and following the training period the subjects were tested. Values [mean (SEM)] obtained in the last test were expressed as percentages of the baseline value and presented for control and experimental groups. Quadriceps femoris isometric muscle force [105.4 (6.2)%, 99.9 (2.0)%; P=0.69], voluntary activation [107.1 (6.0)%, 101.1 (2.3)%; P=0.55] and maximal rate of voluntary force rise [95.4 (6.0)%, 103.3 (7.7)%; P=0.57] did not improve. The maximal rate of force rise during electrical stimulation was increased [102.3 (4.5)%, 123.6 (7.5)%; P=0.02]. Counter movement jump height was not affected by WBV [103.7 (1.8)%, 103.0 (2.8)%; P=0.71]. In conclusion, 11 weeks of standard two-legged WBV training without additional training loads did not improve functional knee extensor muscle strength in healthy young subjects.

Keywords

Electrical stimulation Voluntary activation Maximal rate of force rise 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. de Ruiter
    • 1
  • S. M. van Raak
    • 1
  • J. V. Schilperoort
    • 1
  • A. P. Hollander
    • 1
  • A. de Haan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement SciencesVrije UniversiteitAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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