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European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 88, Issue 6, pp 572–579 | Cite as

Assessment of peak power and short-term work capacity

  • Brian R. MacIntosh
  • Peter Rishaug
  • Krista Svedahl
Original Article

Abstract.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate conditions for conducting a 30 s Wingate test such as load selection, and the method of starting the test (stationary or flying start). Nine male and four female athletes volunteered to be tested on four laboratory visits. Tests were performed on a modified Monark cycle ergometer (Varberg, Sweden) equipped with force transducers on the friction belt and an optical encoder for velocity measurement. Power was calculated with the moment of inertia (I) of the flywheel taken into consideration. One laboratory visit was used to determine individualized optimal resistance conditions. The other three visits were for performance of one of three Wingate tests: a flying start with 0.834 N·kg–1 [85 g·kg–1 body weight (BW)] resistance (FLY-0.8); a stationary start with 0.834 N·kg–1 BW resistance (ST-0.8), or a stationary start with optimal resistance (ST-OPT). FLY-0.8 gave a lower (P<0.05) value for short-term work capacity [19,986 (827) J] than either ST-OPT [23,014 (1,167) J] or ST-0.8 [22,321 (1075) J]. Peak power output per pedal revolution was lower (P<0.005) for FLY-0.8 [833 (40) W] than for either ST-0.8 [974 (57) W] or ST-OPT [989 (61) W]. The results of this study demonstrate that higher values for peak power and short-term work capacity are obtained with a test from a stationary start. It is apparently not necessary to use an individualized optimal resistance when I is considered in a Wingate test initiated from a standstill.

Wingate test Cycle ergometry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian R. MacIntosh
    • 1
  • Peter Rishaug
    • 1
  • Krista Svedahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 1N4

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