Relationships between perceived workload, stress and oxidative DNA damage

  • Masahiro Irie
  • Shinya Asami
  • Shoji Nagata
  • Masakazu Miyata
  • Hiroshi Kasai
SHORT COMMUNICATION

DOI: 10.1007/s004200000209

Cite this article as:
Irie, M., Asami, S., Nagata, S. et al. Int Arch Occup Environ Health (2001) 74: 153. doi:10.1007/s004200000209

Abstract

Objectives: The present study was performed to investigate the relationship between work-related factors, including psychological stress, and the formation of a type of oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), in order to examine their possible risk factor for occupational carcinogenesis. Methods: A total of 54 healthy workers (27 male and 27 female, aged 41.2 ± 12.5 years) in a company were investigated for 8-OH-dG levels in the peripheral blood leukocytes at the time of a questionnaire survey regarding several factors, such as working hours, workload, fatigue, sleep, psychological stress and the prospect of alleviating it. Subjects were limited to non-smoking and non-drinking workers to exclude the influence of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking, which have been reported to have associations with the formation of 8-OH-dG. Results: The levels of 8-OH-dG in female subjects were significantly related to the perceived workload (F=5.56, P=0.010), the perceived psychological stress (F=6.15, P=0.007), and the impossibility of alleviating stress (F=3.82, P=0.048). No associations were observed in male subjects. Conclusions: Psychological stress and perceived overwork appear to be related to the pathogenesis of cancer via the formation of 8-OH-dG, particularly in female workers.

Key words Stress Workload Oxidative DNA damage 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine Cancer 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiro Irie
    • 1
  • Shinya Asami
    • 2
  • Shoji Nagata
    • 1
  • Masakazu Miyata
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Kasai
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan Tel.: +81-93-6917475; Fax: +81-93-6925419 e-mail: m-irie@med.uoeh-u.ac.jpJP
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Oncology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, JapanJP
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, JapanJP

Personalised recommendations