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Response to the letter to the editor by Latza et al.: Indirect evaluation of attributable fractions for psychosocial work exposures: a difficult research area

  • Isabelle NiedhammerEmail author
  • Hélène Sultan-Taïeb
  • Jean-François Chastang
  • Greet Vermeylen
  • Agnès Parent-Thirion
Letter to the Editor
  • 149 Downloads

We thank very much our colleagues from BAuA, Drs Backé, Burr and Latza, for their detailed and useful commentary on our paper entitled ‘Fractions of cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders attributable to psychosocial work factors in 31 countries in Europe’ (Niedhammer et al. 2013). The objectives of this paper were to evaluate the fractions of cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders attributable to various psychosocial work exposures in Europe and to compare the results across 31 countries. Backé et al. put our study in perspective in the difficult research area of indirect evaluation of attributable fractions (AFs), in which all the calculations rely heavily on the available data from the literature. We agree with most of the comments underlined by Backé et al. and we would like to add our own comments to the discussion.

Such a calculation of attributable fractions depends strongly on available data for both prevalence of exposure and relative risk estimates. Regarding...

Keywords

Psychosocial Work Prevention Policy Relative Risk Estimate Attributable Fraction Psychosocial Work Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabelle Niedhammer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Hélène Sultan-Taïeb
    • 5
  • Jean-François Chastang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Greet Vermeylen
    • 4
  • Agnès Parent-Thirion
    • 4
  1. 1.INSERM, U1018, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population HealthEpidemiology of Occupational and Social Determinants of Health TeamVillejuifFrance
  2. 2.Univ Paris-SudVillejuifFrance
  3. 3.Université de Versailles St-QuentinVillejuifFrance
  4. 4.European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working ConditionsDublinIreland
  5. 5.CINBIOSE (Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Biology, Health, Society and Environment)Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)MontrealCanada

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