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Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels in offshore workers

  • Nancy Brenna HopfEmail author
  • Jorunn Kirkeleit
  • Stacy L. Kramer
  • Bente Moen
  • Paul Succop
  • Mary Beth Genter
  • Tania Carreón
  • James Mack
  • Glenn Talaska
Original Article

Abstract

Objectives

To compare differences in pre- and post-shift urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1OHP) levels as a measure of internal dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between two groups of oil production workers offshore assumed to be exposed to PAH, and to compare the exposed group to an unexposed control group.

Methods

Participants’ (n = 42) urine samples, collected over a study period of three consecutive 12-h work days (pre-shift on the first day and post-shift on the third day), were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Analysis of covariance was used in the statistical models.

Results

(1) Post-shift 1OHP levels were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to the controls. (2) Tank workers and process operators did not show statistically significant different post-shift 1OHP levels.

Conclusion

Altogether, this study indicates the presence of a low level PAH exposure among offshore oil production workers.

Keywords

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH 1-Hydroxypyrene Offshore Biological monitoring Crude oil exposure 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Ms. Brenda L. Schumann for assistance in the laboratory and Dr. Howard Shertzer for use of the spectrophotometer. This research study was (partially) supported by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and the Health Pilot Research Project Training Program of the University of Cincinnati Education and Research Center Grant #T42/OH008432-03. The collection of the samples was financed by the Research Council of Norway under the PETROMAKS programme.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Brenna Hopf
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jorunn Kirkeleit
    • 2
  • Stacy L. Kramer
    • 1
  • Bente Moen
    • 2
  • Paul Succop
    • 1
  • Mary Beth Genter
    • 1
  • Tania Carreón
    • 1
  • James Mack
    • 1
  • Glenn Talaska
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Section for Occupational Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Health CareUniversity of BergenBergenNorway

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