Histochemistry and Cell Biology

, Volume 135, Issue 2, pp 153–158 | Cite as

Visualization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vascular tissue using XμCT and histology

  • Rainer Tietze
  • Helene Rahn
  • Stefan Lyer
  • Eveline Schreiber
  • Jenny Mann
  • Stefan Odenbach
  • Christoph Alexiou
Original Paper

Abstract

In order to increase the dose of antineoplastic agents in the tumor area, the concept of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) has been developed. Magnetic nanoparticles consisting of iron oxide and a biocompatible cover layer suspended in an aqueous solution (ferrofluid) serve as carriers for chemotherapeutics being enriched by an external magnetic field after intra-arterial application in desired body compartments (i.e., tumor). We established an ex vivo model to simulate in vivo conditions in a circulating system consisting of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles passing an intact bovine artery and being focused by an external magnetic field to study their distribution in the vessel. Micro-computed X-ray tomography (XμCT) and histology can elucidate the arrangement of these particles after application. XμCT-analysis has been performed on arterial sections after MDT in order to determine the distribution of the nanoparticles. These measurements have been carried out with a cone X-ray source and corresponding histological sections were stained with Prussian blue. It could be shown that combining XμCT and histology offers the opportunity for a better understanding of the mechanisms of nanoparticle deposition in the vascular system after MDT.

Keywords

Magnetic drug targeting XμCT Nanoparticles Cancer therapy Histology 

Abbreviations

MDT

Magnetic drug targeting

DLS

Dynamic light scattering

XμCT

Micro-computed tomography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Tietze
    • 1
  • Helene Rahn
    • 2
  • Stefan Lyer
    • 1
  • Eveline Schreiber
    • 1
  • Jenny Mann
    • 1
  • Stefan Odenbach
    • 2
  • Christoph Alexiou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Section for Experimental Oncology and NanomedicineElse Kröner-Fresenius-StiftungErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Chair of MagnetofluiddynamicsTU DresdenDresdenGermany

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