Histochemistry and Cell Biology

, Volume 128, Issue 4, pp 349–360 | Cite as

Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34/45 cells

  • Tetsuro Tamaki
  • Yoshinori Okada
  • Yoshiyasu Uchiyama
  • Kayoko Tono
  • Maki Masuda
  • Mika Wada
  • Akio Hoshi
  • Akira Akatsuka
Original Paper

Abstract

In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34/CD45 (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2–8 × 104); however, the number increased 10–20 fold (2–16 × 105) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

Keywords

Somatic stem cells Murine skeletal muscle Transplantation Severe muscle damage Tetanic tension out-put 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, and Tokai University Research aid.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuro Tamaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoshinori Okada
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yoshiyasu Uchiyama
    • 1
    • 4
  • Kayoko Tono
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maki Masuda
    • 1
  • Mika Wada
    • 2
  • Akio Hoshi
    • 1
    • 5
  • Akira Akatsuka
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Muscle Physiology and Cell Biology UnitTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Regenerative Medicine, Division of Basic Clinical ScienceTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  3. 3.Teaching and Research Support CenterTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Orthopedics, Division of SurgeryTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Urology, Division of SurgeryTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan

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