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Histochemistry and Cell Biology

, Volume 117, Issue 6, pp 541–546 | Cite as

Immunohistochemical demonstration of Nɛ-(carboxymethyl)lysine protein adducts in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage

  • Wolfgang Schwab
  • Ulrich Friess
  • Ute Hempel
  • Eva Schulze
  • Zenji Makita
  • Michael Kasper
  • Hans-Georg Simank
Original Paper

Abstract.

Nɛ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) is an advanced glycation end product formed by non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins. The distribution pattern of CML-modified proteins in normal and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage was investigated using specific antibodies. In healthy articular cartilage, immunoreactivity for CML was preferably found in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the superficial layer. In OA samples, CML immunoreactivity was not restricted to the ECM of the superficial layer. Interestingly, OA chondrocytes showed a remarkable cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for CML. With the help of a western blot analysis CML-modified proteins between 68 and 39 kDa could be demonstrated in OA cartilage samples. These results suggest that the accumulation of CML adducts contributes to the matrix damage in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the inhibition of CML accumulation may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent severe OA cartilage injury.

Cartilage Osteoarthritis Advanced glycation end products Chondrocyte Immunohistochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Schwab
    • 1
  • Ulrich Friess
    • 2
  • Ute Hempel
    • 3
  • Eva Schulze
    • 4
  • Zenji Makita
    • 5
  • Michael Kasper
    • 1
  • Hans-Georg Simank
    • 6
  1. 1.Institute of Anatomy, Technical University Dresden, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Fiedlerstrasse 42, 01307 Dresden, GermanyGermany
  2. 2.Department for Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, Pathobiochemistry, University Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, GermanyGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Technical University Dresden, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Fiedlerstrasse 42, 01307 Dresden, GermanyGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Dresden, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Fiedlerstrasse 42, 01307 Dresden, GermanyGermany
  5. 5.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hokuriku University, 3-Ho Kanagawa-machi, Kanazawa 920-1181, JapanJapan
  6. 6.Clinic of Orthopedics, University of Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstrasse 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, GermanyGermany

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