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Multimodal imaging for detecting metamorphopsia after successful retinal detachment repair

  • Megir Schawkat
  • Christophe Valmaggia
  • Corina Lang
  • Hendrik PN Scholl
  • Josef GuberEmail author
Retinal Disorders
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the etiologies of metamorphopsia after successful retinal detachment repair.

Methods

In this retrospective study, we included patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Patients were reviewed after 3 to 6 weeks. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus biomicroscopy, Amsler grid test, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and fundus autofluorescence images (FAF) were obtained from all patients to visualize abnormalities in retinal layers and retinal rotation.

Results

A total of 50 eyes from 49 consecutive patients were included, of whom 12 (24%) complained of postoperative metamorphopsia. The main cause of metamorphopsia was retinal shift after RRD repair (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Distorted vision after macula-off RRD is a common and retinal shift was found to be the main reason patients experience metamorphopsia after a successful macula-off RRD repair.

Keywords

Macular shift Metamorphopsia Pars plana vitrectomy Posture retinal detachment Surgical outcome 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. sc. nat. Sabine Güsewell for her assistance in statistical analysis.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Compliance with ethical standards

This study was approved by the local ethics committee (Ethikkommission Ostschweiz, BASEC number 2018-00104). All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Eye Clinic, Cantonal Hospital Sankt GallenSankt GallenSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB)BaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of BaselBaselSwitzerland
  4. 4.Wilmer Eye InstituteJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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