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Longitudinal vasculature changes in branch retinal vein occlusion with projection-resolved optical coherence tomography angiography

  • Kotaro TsuboiEmail author
  • Motohiro Kamei
Retinal Disorders

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze vascular changes in branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) using projection-resolved optical coherence tomography angiography (PR-OCTA).

Methods

We reviewed 30 consecutive eyes of 30 cases with BRVO retrospectively. PR-OCTA was performed during the acute, intermediate, and remission phases when anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drugs suppress cystic changes. The main outcome measures were vessel density (VD) and retinal thickness changes in the superficial capillary plexus (SCP), intermediate capillary plexus (ICP), and deep capillary plexus (DCP).

Results

The VDs did not change longitudinally in the SCP and DCP during the follow-up period. The VD was significantly (p = 0.0105) greater in the ICP during remission than the acute phase. The full retinal thickness (internal limiting membrane [ILM] to retinal pigment epithelium [RPE]) and inner retinal thickness (ILM to inner plexiform layer [IPL]) decreased significantly (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0014, respectively) during the follow-up period. When the inner retina was thinner than 117 μm, the VD in the ICP increased significantly (p = 0.045) during the follow-up period. When the inner retinal layer did not become thinner, the VD in the ICP remained unchanged.

Conclusion

PR-OCTA showed the three distinct vascular plexuses in BRVO. The VDs remained unchanged during the follow-up period in the SCP and DCP but increased significantly in the ICP during remission. Inner retinal thinning might cause increases in the VD in the ICP because of projection artifacts and segmentation errors despite using PR-OCTA.

Keywords

Projection-resolved optical coherence tomography angiography Optical coherence tomography angiography Branch retinal vein occlusion Projection artifact 

Notes

Funding

This study was funded in part by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Tokyo, Japan (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, no. JP17K16993).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Author KT has received a research grant from JSPS and Novartis Pharma KK and speaker honoraria from Abbott Medical Optics, Bayer AG, Novartis Pharma KK, and Santen Co. Author MK has received a speaker honoraria from Alcon Japan Ltd., Abbott Medical Optics, Bayer AG, Bausch & Lomb, Ellex, HOYA Surgical Optics, Johnson & Johnson, Kowa Co., Ltd., Nidek Co., Ltd., Novartis Pharma KK, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Pfizer Japan Inc., Santen Co., and Senju Co., Ltd., and received consultant fees from Astellas Pharma Inc., HOYA Surgical Optics, Nidek Co., Ltd., and Senju Co., Ltd.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyAichi Medical UniversityNagakuteJapan

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