Sustained elevation of intraocular pressure after intravitreal injections of bevacizumab in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

  • Nurit Mathalone
  • Anat Arodi-Golan
  • Shaul Sar
  • Yulia Wolfson
  • Mordechai Shalem
  • Idit Lavi
  • Orna Geyer
Retinal Disorders

Abstract

Background

The use of intravitreal anti-VEGF agents in general, and of bevacizumab (Avastin) in particular, has become the common first-line treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Several reports addressed the possible elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) following intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sustained IOP elevation following intravitreal bevacizumab injections for neovascular AMD and identify possible risk factors for the development of increased IOP.

Methods

This retrospective cohort study included 174 consecutive patients (201 eyes) receiving intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 ml) as treatment for neovascular AMD. The records of the study patients were reviewed for age, gender, history of glaucoma, phakic status, IOP levels, length of follow-up, total number of injections, intervals between injections, and IOP management in eyes that exhibited IOP elevation. Sustained IOP elevation was defined as IOP ≥22 mmHg and a change from baseline of ≥6 mmHg recorded on at least two consecutive visits and lasting ≥30 days. Risk factors for an IOP increase were identified from the association between the studied variables and IOP elevations.

Results

Sustained IOP elevation was found in 22 of 201 eyes (11%). The increased IOP was controlled with topical medications in all eyes. Among the variables studied, only male gender [OR = 3.1, 95% CI (1.1, 8.5) p = 0.029] and length of interval between injections <8 weeks [OR = 3.0, 95%CI (1.1, 7.9), p = 0.028] emerged as risk factors for IOP elevation in a multivariable model. The prevalence of IOP elevation was significantly higher when the interval between injections was <8 weeks than ≥8 weeks (17.6 and 6%, respectively, p = 0.009). Pre-existing glaucoma was not associated with IOP elevation (p = 0.9).

Conclusions

Sustained IOP elevations can occur in normotensive eyes undergoing intravitreal bevacizumab treatment for neovascular AMD. This phenomenon was related to shorter intervals between injections, with 8 weeks being taken as the cut-off point. AMD eyes that receive intravitreal bevacizumab injections need to be monitored for IOP changes, especially those in which the intervals between injections are <8 weeks.

Keywords

Bevacizumab Intraocular pressure (IOP) Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) 

Notes

Financial support

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nurit Mathalone
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anat Arodi-Golan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shaul Sar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yulia Wolfson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mordechai Shalem
    • 1
    • 2
  • Idit Lavi
    • 3
  • Orna Geyer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyCarmel Medical CenterHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Bruce Rappaport Medical SchoolThe TechnionHaifaIsrael
  3. 3.Department of Community Medicine and EpidemiologyCarmel Medical CenterHaifaIsrael

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