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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 244, Issue 7, pp 412–417 | Cite as

Is unilateral spatial neglect a single phenomenon?

A comparative study between exploratory-motor and visual-counting tests
  • S. Maeshima
  • G. Truman
  • D. S. Smith
  • N. Dohi
  • K. Nakai
  • T. Itakura
  • N. Komai
Original communication

Abstract

The aim of this study is to report the preliminary findings of a traditional battery of tests and our original battery capable of assessing the presence of components and extent of lesions in patients with unilateral spatial neglect. Thirty patients who had unilateral spatial neglect with a stroke in the right hemisphere were assessed for unilateral spatial neglect on exploratory-motor (E-M) tasks, visual-counting (V-C) tasks, and traditional neglect batteries at least 4 weeks after the onset. Other neuropsychological tests and computed tomography were also performed to investigate the relationship with neglect. A factor analysis showed that our tasks loaded significantly on three factors. E-M neglect was found in 16 patients, and V-C neglect in 22 patients with unilateral spatial neglect. There were high correlations between E-M neglect and motor paralysis, word fluency, backward digit span and motor impersistence. There were high correlations between V-C neglect and visual-field defect, line bisection, line cancellation and figure copying. Lesions in the frontal lobe, caudate, insula, and anterior portion of the paraventricular white matter were commonly associated with E-M neglect. Lesions in the occipital lobe were also associated with V-C neglect. We suggest that unilateral neglect is not a single phenomenon, but rather involves several different components. We propose that E-M and V-C tasks are useful methods for evaluating the extent of lesions in patients with unilateral spatial neglect.

Key words Unilateral spatial neglect Frontal lobe Cerebrovascular accident Exploratory-motor tasks Perceptual-sensory tasks 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Maeshima
    • 1
  • G. Truman
    • 2
  • D. S. Smith
    • 2
  • N. Dohi
    • 3
  • K. Nakai
    • 4
  • T. Itakura
    • 4
  • N. Komai
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Medical College, 27 Nanabancho, Wakayama 640, Japan Tel.: +81 734 26 8277 Fax: +81 734 33 5998JP
  2. 2.Rehabilitation Studies Unit, University of Sydney & Royal Rehabilitation Centre, 227-259 Morrison Road, Ryde, NSW 2112, Australia Tel.: +61 2 9808 9236 Fax: +61 2 9809 9037AU
  3. 3.Hiroshima Prefectual College of Health Science & Welfare, Hiroshima, JapanJP
  4. 4.Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Medical College, Wakayama, JapanJP

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