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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 263, Issue 1, pp 45–51 | Cite as

Risk factors for the recurrence of post-semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after canalith repositioning

  • Peijen Su
  • Yun-Chih Liu
  • Hung-Ching LinEmail author
Original Communication

Abstract

This retrospective study was conducted to determine the relationship between variable factors and the recurrence rate of post-semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PSC-BPPV) after canalith repositioning procedure (CRP). Patients with PSC-BPPV were diagnosed by history and the presence of a positive Dix–Hallpike maneuver between 2008 and 2010. In total, 243 patients (47 males and 196 females, average age = 57.5 years) treated with Epley’s maneuver or canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) were included in the study. The demographic factors studied were age, sex, sleep disorders, inner ear diseases, head trauma history, and cardiovascular diseases. Multivariate statistics using SPSS version 15, Pearson’s Chi-squared test (χ 2), Kaplan–Meier analysis, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used for the analysis. The success rate of vertigo control after the initial CRP was 83.1 %. Pearson’s χ 2 test results showed that females and participants with sleep disorders exhibited a significant difference in the recurrence of vertigo after the initial CRP. In addition, the Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank test survival analysis revealed that the recurrence was associated with females and participants with sleep disorders and inner ear diseases. However, Cox proportional hazards regression showed no differences in recurrences associated with old age, sex, sleep disorders, inner ear diseases, head trauma, and cardiovascular diseases. Epley’s maneuver or CRP is an effective, safe, and simple treatment for BPPV. Females and participants with sleep disorders and inner ear diseases are likely associated with the recurrence of BPPV after CRP.

Keywords

Sleep disorders Post-semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PSC-BPPV) Canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) Epley’s maneuver 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

All authors including Peijen Su, Yun-Chih Liu, Hung-Ching Lin, declare no conflict of interests. There is also no financial support for this study.

Ethical standard

The study was approved by the Mackay memorial hospital’s institutional review board (13MMHIS054) with chairman of Yen-Ta Lu M.D. PhD. All patients records/information were anonymized and de-identified prior to analysis.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Audiology and Speech-Language PathologyMackay Medical CollegeNew Taipei CityTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Family MedicineMackay Memorial HospitalTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of Otolaryngology, Cathay General Hospital, Department of Speech Hearing Disorders and ScienceNational Taipei University of Nursing and Health SciencesTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of OtolaryngologyMackay Memorial HospitalTaipeiTaiwan

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