Journal of Neurology

, Volume 260, Issue 7, pp 1931–1933

Autosomal dominant mutations in POLG and C10orf2: association with late onset chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Parkinsonism in two patients

  • Barton R. Brandon
  • Nico J. Diederich
  • Madhu Soni
  • Katrin Witte
  • Manja Weinhold
  • Micaela Krause
  • Sandra Jackson
Letter to the Editors

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barton R. Brandon
    • 1
  • Nico J. Diederich
    • 2
  • Madhu Soni
    • 1
  • Katrin Witte
    • 3
  • Manja Weinhold
    • 3
  • Micaela Krause
    • 3
  • Sandra Jackson
    • 3
  1. 1.Rush University Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg and Luxembourg Center for Systems BiomedicineLuxembourg-CityLuxembourg
  3. 3.Mitochondrial Disease Group, Department of NeurologyUniklinikum CG Carus, TU DresdenDresdenGermany

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