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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 259, Issue 10, pp 2251–2254 | Cite as

Interconnections in superior temporal cortex revealed by musicogenic seizure propagation

  • Z. Irene Wang
  • Kazutaka Jin
  • Yosuke Kakisaka
  • Richard C. Burgess
  • Jorge A. Gonzalez-Martinez
  • Shuang Wang
  • Susumu Ito
  • John C. Mosher
  • Stephen Hantus
  • Andreas V. Alexopoulos
Letter to the Editors

Dear Sirs,

Musicogenic epilepsy (ME) is an intriguing epilepsy syndrome with estimated prevalence of 1 per million [1]. Seizures are precipitated by complex and usually highly specific stimuli. ME has been the topic of several excellent reviews [2, 3], but reports of comprehensively studied patients are scarce [1]. Notably, ME can provide insights in auditory processing and seizure-triggering mechanisms in humans. We present here a patient with non-lesional ME, whose seizure initiation and propagation shed light on interconnections within the superior temporal cortex.

A 42-year-old right-handed professional composer started having seizures at 11 years. Seizures became difficult-to-control after he entered music school. Stereotyped auras were consistently triggered by songs with familiar melody and lyrics. “Happy Birthday” and songs by Elton John were especially provocative, whereas jazz/instrumentals had no effect. Auras consisted of buzzing or muffled sounds several times/week,...

Keywords

Auditory Cortex Seizure Onset Focal Cortical Dysplasia Planum Temporale Superior Temporal Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. Shibata for his generous sharing of manuscript figure (panel F) for our modification. We also thank David Jones, PhD for his contribution to the time frequency analysis. This research is supported in part by the Cleveland Clinic Epilepsy Center Fund, the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute Pilot Research Project Fund, and by NIH grants R01-NS074980, and R01-EB009048.

Conflicts of interest

None.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Irene Wang
    • 1
  • Kazutaka Jin
    • 2
  • Yosuke Kakisaka
    • 1
  • Richard C. Burgess
    • 1
  • Jorge A. Gonzalez-Martinez
    • 1
  • Shuang Wang
    • 3
  • Susumu Ito
    • 1
  • John C. Mosher
    • 1
  • Stephen Hantus
    • 1
  • Andreas V. Alexopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Cleveland Clinic Epilepsy CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Department of EpileptologyTohoku University School of MedicineSendaiJapan
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, Second Affiliated HospitalZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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