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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 259, Issue 10, pp 2249–2250 | Cite as

Voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

  • Koji FujitaEmail author
  • Tatsuhiko Yuasa
  • Osamu Watanabe
  • Yukitoshi Takahashi
  • Shuji Hashiguchi
  • Katsuhito Adachi
  • Yuishin Izumi
  • Ryuji Kaji
Letter to the Editors

Dear Sirs,

Clinical presentations of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) can be mimicked by those of immune-mediated encephalopathies, including limbic encephalitis with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies [1, 2]. To date, anti-VGKC complex antibodies have been reported to be negative in CJD [1], thereby regarded as important to differentiate non-CJD dementia from CJD [3]. Here we report a patient with definite CJD who had serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies.

A 60-year-old seaman acutely presented with blurred vision, disturbance in depth perception and light discrimination, difficulty recalling Chinese characters, and right-left disorientation. An ophthalmologist found no abnormality in his eyes. Two months later, he underwent a brain magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging, which showed hyperintensity signals in the bilateral occipital and parietal cortices. Neurologically, there were object agnosia, left hemineglect, dressing apraxia,...

Keywords

Zolpidem Apraxia Limbic Encephalitis Ideomotor Apraxia Show Hyperintensity Signal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Tetsuyuki Kitamoto, Tohoku University School of Medicine, for analyzing the PRNP, Western blotting of PrPSc, and neuropathology; Katsuya Satoh, Nagasaki University, for 14-3-3 and total tau protein measurement. This work was supported by Grants-in-Aid from the Research Committee of Prion Disease and Slow Virus Infection, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan, and Health and Labour Sciences Research Grants for Research on Psychiatry and Neurological Diseases and Mental Health (H20-021).

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koji Fujita
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tatsuhiko Yuasa
    • 2
  • Osamu Watanabe
    • 3
  • Yukitoshi Takahashi
    • 4
  • Shuji Hashiguchi
    • 5
  • Katsuhito Adachi
    • 5
  • Yuishin Izumi
    • 1
  • Ryuji Kaji
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceThe University of Tokushima Graduate SchoolTokushimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyKamagaya-Chiba Medical Center for Intractable Neurological Disease, Kamagaya General HospitalKamagayaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Neurology and GeriatricsKagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesKagoshimaJapan
  4. 4.National Epilepsy Center, Shizuoka Institute of Epilepsy and Neurological DisordersShizuokaJapan
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyNational Hospital Organization Tokushima HospitalYoshinogawaJapan

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