Journal of Neurology

, Volume 259, Issue 11, pp 2293–2298 | Cite as

Anti-JCV antibody prevalence in a French cohort of MS patients under natalizumab therapy

  • Olivier Outteryck
  • Jean-Claude Ongagna
  • Alain Duhamel
  • Hélène Zéphir
  • Nicolas Collongues
  • Arnaud Lacour
  • Marie-Céline Fleury
  • Anne-Sophie Berteloot
  • Frédéric Blanc
  • Marianne Giroux
  • Patrick Vermersch
  • Jérôme de Sèze
Original Communication

Abstract

To measure the prevalence of JCV-specific antibodies in a French cohort of MS patients treated with natalizumab and to identify risk factor(s) of JCV seropositivity. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) risk may be stratified by anti-JCV antibody status, duration of natalizumab therapy (≥24 months) and prior exposure to immunosuppressive (IS) drugs. No data are available in France on the prevalence of anti-JCV antibodies and distribution of PML risk factors in patients treated with natalizumab. Sera of 361 patients under natalizumab therapy in two MS centers were analyzed using a previously validated ELISA test. We studied different characteristics: demographic, ethnic, radiological, clinical, prior use of immunomodulatory (IM) or IS drugs and natalizumab exposure duration. The JCV seropositivity rate was 51 % for the whole cohort. Mean natalizumab exposure duration was 27.27 months ± 15.57 (mean ± SD), and prior use of IS drugs was observed in 15.24 % of patients. Twenty-three patients (6.4 %) presented the three PML risk factors. By multivariate analysis, presence of anti-JCV antibodies was significantly linked to age, North African origin and natalizumab exposure duration. Anti-JCV antibody prevalence was similar to previously published data. Anti-JCV antibody status was linked to age. We also suggested that anti-JCV antibody status could be linked to natalizumab exposure duration and ethnic characteristics.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Natalizumab JCV Progressive multiple leukoencephalopathy 

References

  1. 1.
    Sandrock A, Hotermans C, Richman S et al (2011) Risk stratification for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in MS patients: Role of prior immunosuppressant use, natalizumab-treatment duration, and anti-JCV antibody status [Poster AAN 2011]. P03.248Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gorelik L, Lerner M, Bixler S et al (2010) Anti-JC virus antibodies: Implications for PML risk stratification. Ann Neurol 68:295–303PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Harrell FE Jr, Lee KL, Mark DB (1996) Multivariate prognostic models: issues in developing models, evaluating assumptions and adequacy, and measuring and reducing errors. Stat Med 15:361–387PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sauerbrei W, Schumacher M (1992) A bootstrap resampling procedure for model building: application to the Cox regression model. Stat Med 11:2093–2109PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Warnke C, Dehmel T, Posevitz-Fejfàr A et al (2011) Anti-JCV antibody prevalence in a german MS cohort [abstract]. Mult Scler 10(suppl):P520Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Olsson T, Achiron A, Alfredsson L et al (2011) Prevalence of anti JCV antibodies in a multi-national cohort of multiple sclerosis patients [abstract]. Mult Scler 10(suppl):P338Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bozic C, Richman S, Plavina T et al (2011) Anti-John Cunnigham virus antibody prevalence in multiple sclerosis patients: baseline results of STRATIFY-1. Ann Neurol 70:742–750PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Egli A, Infanti L, Dumoulin A et al (2009) Prevalence of polyomavirus BK and JC infection and replication in 400 healthy blood donors. J Infect Dis 199:836–846CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Chen Y, Bord E, Tompkins T et al (2009) Asymptomatic reactivation of JC virus in patients treated with natalizumab. N Engl J Med 361:1067–1074PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Rudick RA, O’Connor PW, Polman CH et al (2009) Assessment of JC Virus DNA in blood and urine from natalizumab-treated patients. Ann Neurol 68:304–310CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Bozic C, Subramanyam M, Paes D et al (2011) JCV epidemiology in MS: epidemiology on anti-JC virus antibody prevalence in multiple sclerosis patients [abstract]. Mult Scler 10(suppl):P801Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Vermersch P, Kappos L, Gold R et al (2011) Clinical outcomes of natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Neurology 76:1697–1704PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Phan-Ba R, Lommers E, Tshibanda L (2011) MRI preclinical detection and asymptomatic course of a progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) under natalizumab therapy. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 83:284–286Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kappos L, Bates D, Edan G et al (2011) Natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis: updated recommendations for patient selection and monitoring. Lancet Neurol 10:745–758PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sorensen PS, Bertolotto A, Edan G et al (2012) Risk stratification for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients treated with natalizumab. Mutl Scler 18:143–152CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivier Outteryck
    • 1
  • Jean-Claude Ongagna
    • 2
  • Alain Duhamel
    • 3
  • Hélène Zéphir
    • 1
  • Nicolas Collongues
    • 2
  • Arnaud Lacour
    • 1
  • Marie-Céline Fleury
    • 2
  • Anne-Sophie Berteloot
    • 1
  • Frédéric Blanc
    • 2
  • Marianne Giroux
    • 1
  • Patrick Vermersch
    • 1
  • Jérôme de Sèze
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of Lille, Université Lille Nord de France, Hôpital Roger SalengroLille CedexFrance
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of Strasbourg, Hôpital CivilStrasbourgFrance
  3. 3.Department of BiostatisticsCERIM EA2694Lille CedexFrance

Personalised recommendations