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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 258, Issue 2, pp 330–332 | Cite as

Autoimmune encephalopathy presenting as a ‘posterior circulation stroke’

  • H. Kearney
  • B. Murray
  • E. Kavanagh
  • K. O’Rourke
  • P. Kelly
  • T. Lynch
Letter to the Editors

Dear Sirs,

Antibodies to voltage gated potassium channels (VGKC) can result in a reversible form of encephalopathy [1]. Since first described, the clinical phenotype of patients with antibodies to VGKC continues to expand [2]. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of VGKC encephalopathy mimicking a stroke resulting in misdiagnosis.

A 73 year old woman presented with aphasia and right upper limb weakness, 5 days post-carotid endarterectomy for an asymptomatic 90% left carotid stenosis. She had experienced atrial fibrillation (warfarin had not yet been reintroduced), hypertension, diabetes and was an ex-smoker.

A CT brain done within 12 h of presentation did not show any evidence of infarction (Fig.  1). Diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, done 2 days after presentation, demonstrated an increased signal in the left temporal lobe in the region of the hippocampus, amygdala and extending to the pulvinar region of the thalamus (Fig.  2)....

Keywords

Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Mycophenolate Mofetil Carotid Stenosis Posterior Cerebral Artery Limbic Encephalitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kearney
    • 1
    • 3
  • B. Murray
    • 1
  • E. Kavanagh
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. O’Rourke
    • 1
    • 3
  • P. Kelly
    • 1
    • 3
  • T. Lynch
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.The Dublin Neurological Institute at the Mater Misericordiae University HospitalDublin 7Ireland
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyMater Misericordiae Hospital UniversityDublinIreland
  3. 3.Dublin Academic Health CentreDublinIreland

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