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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 257, Issue 9, pp 1570–1572 | Cite as

Pseudovestibular neuritis associated with isolated insular stroke

  • Bo-Young Ahn
  • Jin-Won Bae
  • Dong-Hyun Kim
  • Kwang-Dong Choi
  • Hak-Jin Kim
  • Eun-Joo KimEmail author
Letter to the Editors

Dear Sirs,

Damage to the cerebellum or brainstem can often cause vestibular dysfunction. Although rare, central rotational vertigo following cerebral cortical lesions has also been reported [1, 4, 5, 7]. However, no report has documented objective nystagmus associated with central rotational vertigo in cortical stroke. We describe a patient with rotational vertigo who showed mixed horizontal and torsional spontaneous nystagmus mimicking peripheral vestibulopathy in isolated insular infarction.

A 51-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of word finding difficulty. She had history of Hashimoto thyroiditis. On admission, neurological examinations were unremarkable. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an acute infarction in the left insula. Small parts of the frontal operculum were also involved (Fig.  1a). One day after symptom onset, her word finding difficulty had completely resolved and the Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery was administered on the same day...

Keywords

Vestibular Neuritis Spontaneous Nystagmus Left Insula Head Impulse Test Canal Paresis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a grant of the Korea Health 21 R&D Project, Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs, Republic of Korea (A050079).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bo-Young Ahn
    • 1
  • Jin-Won Bae
    • 1
  • Dong-Hyun Kim
    • 2
  • Kwang-Dong Choi
    • 1
  • Hak-Jin Kim
    • 3
  • Eun-Joo Kim
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyPusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research InstituteBusanKorea
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical Engineering LabPusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research InstituteBusanKorea
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyPusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research InstituteBusanKorea

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