Journal of Neurology

, 256:568 | Cite as

Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS

  • Katherine Treadaway
  • Gary Cutter
  • Amber Salter
  • Sharon Lynch
  • James Simsarian
  • John Corboy
  • Douglas Jeffery
  • Bruce Cohen
  • Ken Mankowski
  • Joseph Guarnaccia
  • Lawrence Schaeffer
  • Roy Kanter
  • David Brandes
  • Charles Kaufman
  • David Duncan
  • Ellen Marder
  • Arthur Allen
  • John Harney
  • Joanna Cooper
  • Douglas Woo
  • Olaf Stüve
  • Michael Racke
  • Elliot M. Frohman
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION

Abstract

Background

The complexity and cost of injection treatment can represent a formidable challenge for patients affected by a chronic illness, particularly those whose treatment is primarily preventative and only modestly effective on the more conspicuous symptomatic aspects of the disease process. The aim of this investigation was to identify which factors most influenced nonadherent behavior with the available diseasemodifying injection therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS).

Methods

A multicenter, observational (threewave) study using surveys was developed and administered to patients with MS through the World Wide Web. Healthcare providers at 17 neurology clinics recruited patients for the study.

Results

A total of 798 patients responded to the baseline wave of the study (708 responded to all three waves). The nonadherence rates for all patients (missing one or more injections) across these waves remained relatively stable at 39 %, 37 %, and 36 %, respectively. The most common reason participants listed for missing injections was that they simply forgot to administer the medication (58 %). Other factors including injection-site reactions, quality of life, patients’ perceptions on the injectable medications, hope, depression, and support were also assessed in relation to adherence.

Conclusions

This study characterizes factors that are associated with failure to fully adhere with disease modifying injection therapy for MS and underscores the principles associated with optimizing adherence and its implications for effective treatment of the disease process in MS.

Key words

compliance adherence multiple sclerosis disease modifying therapy injections 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Treadaway
    • 1
  • Gary Cutter
    • 2
  • Amber Salter
    • 1
  • Sharon Lynch
    • 3
  • James Simsarian
    • 4
  • John Corboy
    • 5
  • Douglas Jeffery
    • 6
  • Bruce Cohen
    • 7
  • Ken Mankowski
    • 8
  • Joseph Guarnaccia
    • 9
  • Lawrence Schaeffer
    • 10
  • Roy Kanter
    • 11
  • David Brandes
    • 12
  • Charles Kaufman
    • 13
  • David Duncan
    • 14
  • Ellen Marder
    • 15
  • Arthur Allen
    • 16
  • John Harney
    • 17
  • Joanna Cooper
    • 18
  • Douglas Woo
    • 19
  • Olaf Stüve
    • 1
  • Michael Racke
    • 20
  • Elliot M. Frohman
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of NeurologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasDallasUSA
  2. 2.University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public HealthBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.University of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA
  4. 4.Neurology Associates of FairfaxFairfaxUSA
  5. 5.University of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA
  6. 6.Wake Forest University Health Sciences CenterWinston-SalemUSA
  7. 7.Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Capital Neurology Services and MS Institute, Inc.ColumbusUSA
  9. 9.Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Center at Griffin HospitalDerbyUSA
  10. 10.Neurology Consultants of AmarilloAmarilloUSA
  11. 11.VIA Medical CenterCheyenneUSA
  12. 12.Hope NeurologyKnoxvilleUSA
  13. 13.Louisiana Neurologic ConsultantsBaton RougeUSA
  14. 14.MKMG Neurology MS CenterMount KiscoUSA
  15. 15.Neurology Specialists of DallasDallasUSA
  16. 16.Neurology ConsultantsOverland ParkUSA
  17. 17.Dallas Neurological AssociatesRichardsonUSA
  18. 18.East Bay Physicians Medical GroupBerkeleyUSA
  19. 19.Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA
  20. 20.Ohio State University Medical CenterColumbusUSA

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