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Journal of Neurology

, Volume 252, Issue 10, pp 1210–1216 | Cite as

Vascular risk factors in the Swiss population

  • K. Nedeltchev
  • M. Arnold
  • R. Baumgartner
  • G. Devuyst
  • P. Erne
  • D. Hayoz
  • R. Sztajzel
  • B. Tettenborn
  • H. P. MattleEmail author
  • on behalf of the Swiss Heart Foundation and the Cerebrovascular Working Group of Switzerland
ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION

Abstract

Background and Purpose

Identification of the population at risk of stroke remains the best approach to assess the burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Methods

The prevalence of hypertension (HT), hypercholesterolemia (HCh), diabetes mellitus (DM), overweight (OW), obesity (OB), tobacco use (SM), and their combinations was examined in 4458 Swiss persons (1741 men and 2717 women, mean age 57.8 ± 15 years), who volunteered for the present survey.

Results

OW was the most prevalent risk factor (50 %), followed by HT (47%), HCh (33%), SM (13 %) and DM (1.6 %). The proportion of persons without risk factors (RF) was 19.9%, with 1 RF 41.5%, 2 RF 33.8%, 3 RF 4%, and 4 RF 0.9%. OW was more prevalent in men than in women (53% vs. 41%, P=0.02). More men than women aged 41–50 years and 51–60 years had HT (49 % vs. 36%, P=0.01, and 52 % vs. 42%, P=0.02). The prevalence of HCh and DM did not show any sex–related differences. HT, OW and HCh were not only the most common single risk factors, but were also most likely to aggregate with each other.

Conclusions

The majority of Swiss people have one or two vascular risk factors. OW and HT are by far most common and are likely to aggregate with each other. A small modification of these two factors would reduce the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction significantly.

Key words

vascular risk factors stroke epidemiology hypertension hypercholesterolemia obesity Switzerland 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Nedeltchev
    • 1
  • M. Arnold
    • 1
  • R. Baumgartner
    • 2
  • G. Devuyst
    • 3
  • P. Erne
    • 4
  • D. Hayoz
    • 5
  • R. Sztajzel
    • 6
  • B. Tettenborn
    • 7
  • H. P. Mattle
    • 1
    Email author
  • on behalf of the Swiss Heart Foundation and the Cerebrovascular Working Group of Switzerland
  1. 1.Dept. of NeurologyUniversity Hospital of BernBernSwitzerland
  2. 2.Dept. of NeurologyUniversity of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  3. 3.Dept. of NeurologyCHUVLausanneSwitzerland
  4. 4.Division of CardiologyKantonsspital LuzernZurichSwitzerland
  5. 5.Division of Hypertension and Vascular MedicineCHUVLausanneSwitzerland
  6. 6.Dept. of NeurologyUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  7. 7.Neurology ClinicKantonsspital St.GallenSt.GallenSwitzerland

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