Chromosoma

, Volume 113, Issue 8, pp 409–417 | Cite as

Rephrasing anaphase: separase FEARs shugoshin

Mini-Review

Abstract

Cleavage of the ring-like cohesin complex by separase triggers segregation of sister chromatids in anaphase. This simplistic model has recently been extended by exciting discoveries on three levels: regulation of anaphase by posttranslational modifications and the cohesin protector shugoshin; non-proteolytic roles of separase; and cohesin-independent linkage of sister chromatids.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We apologize to our colleagues whose work could not be cited due to space constraints. O.S. is supported by grants from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG; Emmy Noether Program) and from the Human Frontier Science Program.

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© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular Cell BiologyMax Planck Institute of BiochemistryMartinsriedGermany

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