Chromosoma

, Volume 112, Issue 5, pp 231–239

A proposed role for the Polycomb group protein dRING in meiotic sister-chromatid cohesion

  • Eric M. Balicky
  • Lynn Young
  • Terry L. Orr-Weaver
  • Sharon E. Bickel
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00412-003-0266-0

Cite this article as:
Balicky, E.M., Young, L., Orr-Weaver, T.L. et al. Chromosoma (2004) 112: 231. doi:10.1007/s00412-003-0266-0

Abstract

ORD protein is required for accurate chromosome segregation during male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Null ord mutations result in random segregation of sister chromatids during both meiotic divisions because cohesion is completely abolished prior to kinetochore capture of microtubules during meiosis I. Previous analyses of mutant ord alleles have led us to propose that the C-terminal half of the ORD protein mediates protein-protein interactions that are essential for sister-chromatid cohesion. To identify proteins that interact with ORD, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen using an ORD bait and isolated dRING, a core subunit of the Drosophila Polycomb repressive complex 1. We show that a missense mutation in ORD completely ablates the two-hybrid interaction with dRING and prevents nuclear retention of the mutant ORD protein in male meiotic cells. Using affinity-purified antibodies generated against full-length recombinant dRING, we demonstrate that dRING protein is expressed in the male and female gonads and colocalizes extensively with ORD on the chromatin of primary spermatocytes during G2 of meiosis. Our results suggest a novel role for the Polycomb group protein dRING and are consistent with the model that interaction of dRING and ORD is required to promote the proper segregation of meiotic chromosomes.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric M. Balicky
    • 1
  • Lynn Young
    • 2
  • Terry L. Orr-Weaver
    • 2
  • Sharon E. Bickel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  2. 2.Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of BiologyMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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