Chromosoma

, Volume 111, Issue 1, pp 22–36

Heterochromatin, HP1 and methylation at lysine 9 of histone H3 in animals

  • Ian G. Cowell
  • Rebecca Aucott
  • Shantha K. Mahadevaiah
  • Paul S. Burgoyne
  • Neville Huskisson
  • Silvia Bongiorni
  • Giorgio Prantera
  • Laura Fanti
  • Sergio Pimpinelli
  • Rong Wu
  • David M. Gilbert
  • Wei Shi
  • Reinald Fundele
  • Harris Morrison
  • Peter Jeppesen
  • Prim B. Singh
Original Article

Abstract.

We show that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (Me9H3) is a marker of heterochromatin in divergent animal species. It localises to both constitutive and facultative heterochromatin and replicates late in S-phase of the cell cycle. Significantly, Me9H3 is enriched in the inactive mammalian X chromosome (Xi) in female cells, as well as in the XY body during meiosis in the male, and forms a G-band pattern along the arms of the autosomes. Me9H3 is a constituent of imprinted chromosomes that are repressed. The paternal and maternal pronuclei in one-cell mouse embryos show a striking non-equivalence in Me9H3: the paternal pronucleus contains no immunocytologically detectable Me9H3. The levels of Me9H3 on the parental chromosomes only become equivalent after the two-cell stage. Finally, we provide evidence that Me9H3 is neither necessary nor sufficient for localisation of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to chromosomal DNA.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian G. Cowell
    • 1
  • Rebecca Aucott
    • 1
  • Shantha K. Mahadevaiah
    • 2
  • Paul S. Burgoyne
    • 2
  • Neville Huskisson
    • 3
  • Silvia Bongiorni
    • 4
  • Giorgio Prantera
    • 4
  • Laura Fanti
    • 5
  • Sergio Pimpinelli
    • 5
  • Rong Wu
    • 6
  • David M. Gilbert
    • 6
  • Wei Shi
    • 7
  • Reinald Fundele
    • 7
  • Harris Morrison
    • 8
  • Peter Jeppesen
    • 8
  • Prim B. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Reprogramming Laboratory, Division of Gene Expression and Development, The Roslin Institute (Edinburgh), Midlothian, EH25 9PS, UK
  2. 2.Laboratory of Developmental Genetics, National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London, NW7 1AA, UK
  3. 3.Severn Biotech, Unit 2, Park Lane, Stourport Road, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, DY11 6JT, UK
  4. 4.Dipartimento di Agrobiologia e Agrochimica, Universita' della Tuscia, Via San C. De Lellis, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Genetica e Biologia Molecolare, Università di Roma "La Sapienza", Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy
  6. 6.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E. Adams Street, Syracuse, N.Y. 13210, USA
  7. 7.Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Genetik (MPIMG), Ihnestrasse 73, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem, Germany
  8. 8.MRC Human Genetics Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, EH4 2XU, UK

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