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Gamma-ray attenuation properties of some NLO materials: potential use in dosimetry

  • M. S. Al-BuriahiEmail author
  • V. P. Singh
  • Halil Arslan
  • V. V. Awasarmol
  • Baris T. Tonguc
Original Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Mass attenuation coefficients (\(\mu _{\text {m}}\)) for some nonlinear optical materials such as potassium dihydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, zinc tris-thiourea sulphate, and zinc thiourea chloride were measured using a \(2\times 2\) NaI(Tl) scintillation detector at gamma energies of 122 keV, 356 keV, 511 keV, 662 keV, 840 keV, 1170 keV, 1270 keV, and 1330 keV. In addition, GEANT4 simulations were carried out to mimic the experiment at these energies. As a result, good agreement between the experimental and GEANT4 results was observed. The measured \(\mu _{\text {m}}\) values were used to compute effective atomic numbers (\(Z_{\text {eff}}\)) for the selected materials. It was found that the \(Z_{\text {eff}}\) values were in the range typical for dosimetric materials.

Keywords

Attenuation coefficient \(Z_{\text {eff}}\) GEANT4 NLO material 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The corresponding author would like to express his deep appreciation to Prof. Werner Ruhm, Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany for his an excellent corrections and suggestions to improve the present work.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhysicsSakarya UniversitySakaryaTurkey
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsKarnatak UniversityDharwadIndia
  3. 3.Electrical and Electronics EngineeringSakarya University of Applied SciencesSakaryaTurkey
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsDr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada UniversityAurangabadIndia

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