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Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology

, Volume 138, Issue 2, pp 127–142 | Cite as

Zircon ages for high pressure granulites from South Bohemia, Czech Republic, and their connection to Carboniferous high temperature processes

  • A. Kröner
  • P. J. O'Brien
  • A. A. Nemchin
  • R. T. Pidgeon
Article

Abstract

Petrological and isotopic investigations were undertaken on high pressure granulites of granitic to mafic composition from the Prachatice and Blanský les granulite complexes of southern Bohemia, Czech Republic. The predominant felsic granulites are quartz + ternary feldspar (now mesoperthite)-rich rocks containing minor garnet, kyanite and rutile, and most show a characteristic mylonitic fabric formed during retrogression along the exhumation path. Three high temperature reaction stages at distinctly different pressures are recognized. Rare layers of intermediate to mafic composition, containing clinopyroxene, best record a primary high pressure–high temperature stage (>15 kbar, >900 °C), and a well-defined overprint at medium pressure granulite facies conditions (6–8 kbar, 700–800 °C) during which orthopyroxene (+plagioclase) formed from garnet and clinopyroxene. A further high temperature overprint at lower pressure (ca. 4 kbar) is reflected in the development of cordierite- and/or andalusite-bearing partial-melt patches in some felsic granulites.

Conventionally separated zircons from the granulites were measured on a SHRIMP II ion microprobe. Near-spherical, multifaceted grains interpreted to be metamorphic, and short prismatic grains from the cordierite-bearing melt patch, are all concordant and yielded indistinguishable results producing an average age, for 83 individual grain spots, of 339.8 ± 2.6 Ma (2σ). Metamorphic grains from a meta-granodiorite associated with the granulites gave the same age (339.6 ± 3.1 Ma, mean of 9), whereas inherited magmatic grains of the same sample yielded 367.8 ± 1.4 Ma. A mean age of 469.3 ± 3.8 Ma was obtained for two short prismatic concordant grains in one of the granulites, whereas several of the rounded grains with ca. 340 Ma metamorphic zircon overgrowths had much older (207Pb/206Pb minimum ages up to 1771 Ma) discordant cores. In addition to analysis of conventionally separated grains, ion-microprobe measurements were also made on zircons extracted from thin sections (drilled-out, mounted and repolished) such that a direct relationship between the dated zircons and petrographic position could be made. Identical results were obtained from both preparation methods, thus showing that the considerable advantage in petrological control is not offset by any appreciable lack of precision when compared to conventionally prepared ion-microprobe samples. All these isotopic results are identical to those previously obtained by conventional multigrain and single-grain evaporation techniques, but rather than allowing a greater resolution of the age of the petrographically obvious different metamorphic stages the results document, for the first time, the apparent short time scale for high, medium and low pressure metamorphism in the granulites. The short time period between the 340 Ma age for the high pressure granulites, as derived here and from studies of similar rocks elsewhere in the European Variscides, and the 320–330 Ma ages for regional low pressure–high temperature metamorphism, migmatization and granite magmatism, strongly suggests an important link between these two high temperature processes.

Keywords

Zircon Cordierite Kyanite High Temperature Process Metamorphic Zircon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kröner
    • 1
  • P. J. O'Brien
    • 2
  • A. A. Nemchin
    • 3
  • R. T. Pidgeon
    • 3
  1. 1.Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany e-mail: kroener@mail.uni-mainz.de Tel.:+49-6131-3922163; Fax: +49-6131-3924769DE
  2. 2.Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, Postfach 101251, 95440 Bayreuth, GermanyDE
  3. 3.Department of Applied Geology, Curtin University of Technology, Bentley, 6012 WA, AustraliaAU

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