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Archive for History of Exact Sciences

, Volume 63, Issue 3, pp 289–323 | Cite as

Giulio Racah and theoretical physics in Jerusalem

  • Nissan Zeldes
Article

Abstract

The present article considers Giulio Racah’s contributions to general physical theory and his establishment of theoretical physics as a discipline in Israel. Racah developed mathematical methods that are based on tensor operators and continuous groups. These methods revolutionized spectroscopy. Currently, these are essential research tools in atomic, nuclear and elementary particle physics. He himself applied them to modernizing theoretical atomic spectroscopy. Racah laid the foundations of theoretical physics in Israel. He educated several generations of Israeli physicists, and put Israel on the world map of physics.

Keywords

Angular Momentum Quantum Number Irreducible Representation Atomic Spectrum Complex Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Racah Institute of PhysicsThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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