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Archive for History of Exact Sciences

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 251–266 | Cite as

Halley’s Method for Calculating the Earth-Sun Distance

  • L. W. B. Browne
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Merewether HeightsNSWAustralia

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