Taenia solium DNA is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of neurocysticercosis patients and can be used for diagnosis

  • C. R. Almeida
  • E. P. Ojopi
  • C. M. Nunes
  • L. R. Machado
  • O. M. Takayanagui
  • J. A. Livramento
  • R. Abraham
  • W. F. Gattaz
  • A. J. Vaz
  • E. Dias-Neto
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic infection of the CNS and the main cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. Seizures are the most common symptoms of the disease, together with headache, involuntary movements, psychosis and a global mental deterioration. Absolute diagnostic criteria include the identification of cysticerci, with scolex, in the brain by MRI imaging. We demonstrate here, for the first time, that T. solium DNA is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. The PCR amplification of the parasite DNA in the CSF enabled the correct identification of 29/30 cases (96.7 %). The PCR diagnosis of parasite DNA in the CSF may be a strong support for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis.

Key words

PCR CSF neurocysticercosis Taenia solium liquor 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Almeida
    • 1
  • E. P. Ojopi
    • 1
  • C. M. Nunes
    • 2
  • L. R. Machado
    • 3
  • O. M. Takayanagui
    • 4
  • J. A. Livramento
    • 3
  • R. Abraham
    • 5
  • W. F. Gattaz
    • 1
  • A. J. Vaz
    • 6
  • E. Dias-Neto
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratório de Neurociências (LIM27), Instituto e Departamento de PsiquiatriaFaculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (FMUSP)São Paulo, SPBrazil
  2. 2.Depto de Apoio, Produção e Saúde AnimalUNESP-AraçatubaAraçatuba, SPBrazil
  3. 3.Depto de NeurologiaFMUSP, Universidade de São PauloSão Paulo, SPBrazil
  4. 4.Depto de NeurologiaFaculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São PauloRibeirão Preto, SPBrazil
  5. 5.Depto de MedicinaUniversidade de TaubatéTaubaté, SPBrazil
  6. 6.Laboratório de Imunologia ClínicaFac. Ciências Farmacêuticas, USPSão Paulo, SPBrazil

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