Regional cerebral blood flow change in a case of Alzheimer's disease with musical hallucinations

  • T. Mori
  • M. Ikeda
  • R. Fukuhara
  • Y. Sugawara
  • S. Nakata
  • N. Matsumoto
  • P. J. Nestor
  • H. Tanabe
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

We examined alteration of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a case of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient with musical hallucination. To detect regions related to musical hallucination, single–photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the patient and nine sex, age, and cognitive functionmatched AD patients without delusions and hallucinations were compared using statistical parametric mapping 99 (SPM99). In comparison with controls, the patient had increased rCBF in left temporal regions and left angular gyrus. This profile could be relevant to the neuroanatomical basis of musical hallucinations.

Key words

single–photon emission computed tomography regional cerebral blood flow musical hallucination Alzheimer's disease superior temporal gyrus 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Mori
    • 1
  • M. Ikeda
    • 1
  • R. Fukuhara
    • 1
  • Y. Sugawara
    • 2
  • S. Nakata
    • 2
  • N. Matsumoto
    • 1
  • P. J. Nestor
    • 3
  • H. Tanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeuropsychiatryEhime University School of Medicine, Toon cityEhime 791-0295Japan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyEhime University School of Medicine, Toon cityEhime 791-0295Japan
  3. 3.University of Cambridge Neurology UnitAddenbrooke's HospitalCambridge, CB2 2QQUK

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