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European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

, Volume 276, Issue 6, pp 1561–1571 | Cite as

Association between bone mineral density and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a meta-analysis

  • Ling-Ling He
  • Xin-Yi LiEmail author
  • Miao-Miao Hou
  • Xiao-Qiong Li
Review Article

Abstract

Background

The association between bone mineral density (BMD) and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) has been investigated by multiple studies, but the conclusions are controversial. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate whether the bone mineral density is associated with BPPV.

Methods

The relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, Web of Science database up to June 2018. Statas14.0 software was used for meta-analysis. We used the pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to assess the incidence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in patients with BPPV and controls (free of BPPV disease). The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the T score in BPPV patients and controls. This meta-analysis has been registered at International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) (number CRD42018082271).

Results

A total of 11 studies were eligible for meta-analysis, including 1982 subjects. When compared with the controls, the total incidence of osteoporosis and osteopenia was significantly higher in BPPV patients (OR 3.27, 95% CI 2.66–4.03, p < 0.0001). Further analysis was conducted by separate discussion about the incidence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in BPPV patients, the result of which shows that both the incidence of osteoporosis (OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.86–6.51, p < 0.0001) and the incidence of osteopenia (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.01–3.04, p < 0.0001) were higher in BPPV patients than that in controls. There was an significant reduction in T scores of BPPV patients (SMD − 0.82, 95% CI −1.18 to − 0.46, p < 0.0001). Publication bias for each analysis was evaluated by Egger’s test and Begg’s indicating that no publication bias existed. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for each analysis demonstrating that the results were robust.

Conclusions

Our meta-analysis provided stronger evidence that patients with BPPV were associated with a lower T score and a higher risk of osteoporosis and osteopenia. The results demonstrated that lower bone mineral density may be a risk factor for BPPV. However, large-scare, multicenter clinical studies need to be carried out to explore the precise risk of osteoporosis and osteopenia in patients with BPPV in future.

Keywords

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV Osteoporosis Osteopenia Bone mineral density Meta-analysis 

Abbreviations

BMD

Bone mineral density

BPPV

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

PROSPERO

Prospective register of systematic reviews

NOS

Newcastle-Ottawa Scale

RCTs

Randomized controlled trial

Notes

Funding

No specific grant from any funding agency in public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors has been provided for this meta-analysis.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyShanxi Dayi Hospital Affiliated to Shanxi Medical UniversityTaiyuanChina

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