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European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

, Volume 271, Issue 6, pp 1729–1735 | Cite as

Extended vertical hemilaryngectomy and reconstruction with a neovascularised tracheal autograft for advanced unilateral laryngeal tumours: a learning curve

  • Samuel C. LeongEmail author
  • Navdeep Upile
  • Andrew Lau
  • Jeffrey Lancaster
  • Prav Praveen
  • Simon N. Rogers
  • Richard Shaw
  • Terence M. Jones
Head and Neck

Abstract

Extended vertical hemilaryngectomy and reconstruction with a neovascularised tracheal autograft is a two-stage procedure for advanced unilateral tumours of the larynx. The purpose of this study was to review our early experience of this technique by reporting our clinical outcomes and highlighting some key learning points. Patients were identified from the Liverpool Head and Neck Cancer electronic database. Case notes were reviewed for demographic data, tumour stage, treatment, complications and outcomes. Eleven patients (all males) were identified. The mean age of the cohort was 58.2 years (range 37–78 years). The overall average follow-up period was 41.5 months (range 14 days–75 months). Of the 11 cases, 3 had completed stage 1 only. The most common complications following stage 1 procedure are related to the surgical neck wound (36 % of cases). Of the remaining eight patients who completed the first two surgical stages, closure of tracheostomy stoma was possible in seven; all seven subsequently resumed a normal oral diet. All these patients have subsequently remained free of disease at latest follow-up. There were two cases of post-operative pneumonia and one case of radial forearm free-flap failure. In contrast, only one case of post-operative pneumonia was recorded following the stage 2 procedure. In total, three patients in this cohort were dead at follow-up. This technique has a role in the management of a select group of fit patients presenting with unilateral tumours of the glottis and who are otherwise destined for a total laryngectomy. Whilst the technique is complex, we have shown that its introduction is possible in a suitably specialised and motivated surgical unit.

Keywords

Hemilaryngectomy Trachea Autotransplantation Carcinoma Chondrosarcoma 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the generous support and encouragement offered by Professor Delaere in order for them to learn his pioneering technique and for his critical appraisal of this manuscript, as well as supplying the figures which accompany this article.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel C. Leong
    • 1
    Email author
  • Navdeep Upile
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrew Lau
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Lancaster
    • 1
  • Prav Praveen
    • 3
  • Simon N. Rogers
    • 3
  • Richard Shaw
    • 2
    • 3
  • Terence M. Jones
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck SurgeryUniversity Hospital AintreeLiverpoolUK
  2. 2.Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool CR-UK CentreUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  3. 3.Regional Maxillofacial UnitUniversity Hospital AintreeLiverpoolUK

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