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European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

, Volume 264, Issue 5, pp 505–507 | Cite as

Herpes zoster laryngitis: case report and serological profile

  • Jean-Baptiste Watelet
  • Anne-Sophie Evrard
  • Georges Lawson
  • Katrien Bonte
  • Marc Remacle
  • Paul Van Cauwenberge
  • Hubert Vermeersch
Laryngology

Abstract

Compared to herpes zoster oticus, varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivations in immunocompetent patients are rare in laryngeal region. Usually, associated vocal cord paralyses are reported. Herein is a case report of a patient with laryngeal zoster without any associated motor disorders. An attempt is made to assign the distribution of mucosal eruptions to the appropriate neuroanatomical structures. A description of the serological course of VZV IgM and IgG are provided. Vesicles were found on the left sensory distribution areas of the superior laryngeal nerve. VZV IgM and IgG antibodies reached their peak 1 month after initial symptoms. Attentive follow-up and no antiviral therapy were advocated because of the absence of any immune deficiency or endoscopic suspicion of malignancy. In this case of VZV reactivation in the sensitive area of the superior laryngeal nerve, serological profiles of VZV IgM and IgG were profoundly modified up to the fourth month.

Keywords

Nervus laryngeus superior Larynx Varicella zoster virus Serology 

Notes

Acknowledgment

Professor Y. Glupczynski from the Department of Microbiology of University Hospital of Mont-Godinne, and Dr. L. Van Renterghem, from the laboratory for infectious diseases of Ghent University Hospital, Belgium, contributed to the interpretation of the serological analyses.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-Baptiste Watelet
    • 1
  • Anne-Sophie Evrard
    • 2
  • Georges Lawson
    • 2
  • Katrien Bonte
    • 1
  • Marc Remacle
    • 2
  • Paul Van Cauwenberge
    • 1
  • Hubert Vermeersch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck SurgeryGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck SurgeryCHU Mont-Godinne, UCLYvoirBelgium

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