Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 287, Issue 6, pp 1241–1249

Relationship of leptin administration with production of reactive oxygen species, sperm DNA fragmentation, sperm parameters and hormone profile in the adult rat

  • Shima Abbasihormozi
  • Abdolhossein Shahverdi
  • Azam Kouhkan
  • Javad Cheraghi
  • Ali Asghar Akhlaghi
  • Abolfazl Kheimeh
Reproductive Medicine

Abstract

Purpose

Leptin, an adipose tissue-derived hormone, plays an important role in energy homeostasis and metabolism, and in the neuroendocrine and reproductive systems. The function of leptin in male reproduction is unclear; however, it is known to affect sex hormones, sperm motility and its parameters. Leptin induces mitochondrial superoxide production in aortic endothelia and may increase oxidative stress and abnormal sperm production in leptin-treated rats. This study aims to evaluate whether exogenous leptin affects sperm parameters, hormone profiles, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in adult rats.

Methods

A total of 65 Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three treated groups and a control group. Treated rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of 5, 10 and 30 μg/kg of leptin administered for a duration of 7, 15, and 42 days. Control rats were given 0.1 mL of 0.9 % normal saline for the same period. One day after final drug administration, we evaluated serum specimens for follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), leutinizing hormone (LH), free testosterone (FT), and total testosterone (TT) levels. Samples from the rat epididymis were also evaluated for sperm parameters and motility characteristics by a Computer-Aided Semen Analysis (CASA) system. Samples were treated with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) and analyzed using flow cytometry and TUNEL to determine the impact of leptin administration on sperm DNA fragmentation.

Results

According to CASA, significant differences in all sperm parameters in leptin-treated rats and their age-matched controls were detected, except for TM, ALH and BCF. Serum FSH and LH levels were significantly higher in rats that received 10 and 30 μg/kg of leptin compared to those treated with 5 μg/kg of leptin in the same group and control rats (P < 0.05). ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly higher in rats injected with 10 and 30 μg/kg of leptin for 7 and 15 days compared with rats treated with 5 μg/kg of leptin and the control group (P < 0.05) for the same time period. However, at day 42 of treatment, ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation levels significantly decreased in all groups (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

According to these results, leptin can possibly affect male infertility by ROS induction or hormone profile modulation.

Keywords

Leptin Reactive oxidative species DNA fragmentation Sperm quality 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shima Abbasihormozi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Abdolhossein Shahverdi
    • 1
  • Azam Kouhkan
    • 1
  • Javad Cheraghi
    • 2
  • Ali Asghar Akhlaghi
    • 4
  • Abolfazl Kheimeh
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Embryology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research CenterRoyan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECRTehranIran
  2. 2.School of Veterinary MedicineIlam UniversityIlamIran
  3. 3.Animal core Facility, Reproductive Biomedicine Research CenterRoyan Institute for Animal Biotechnology, ACECRTehranIran
  4. 4.Epidemiology and Reproductive Health Department, Reproductive Epidemiology Research CenterRoyan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECRTehranIran

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