Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 285, Issue 6, pp 1699–1702 | Cite as

Clinicopathological features and immunoprofile of 30 cases of Brenner ovarian tumors

  • A. Kondi-Pafiti
  • Evi Kairi-Vassilatou
  • Ch. Iavazzo
  • Em. Vouza
  • P. Mavrigiannaki
  • Ch. Kleanthis
  • D. Vlahodimitropoulos
  • A. Liapis
Gynecologic Oncology

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological and immunopathological features of Brenner ovarian tumors.

Materials and methods

Thirty cases of Brenner ovarian tumors were examined in our laboratory among 1,680 cases of ovarian tumors, representing 1.5% of all tumors examined. Blocks of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue for all cases were available for additional immunohistochemical stain by a Ventana autoimmunostainer. Moreover, antibodies for Uroplakine III (cellmarque AU-1 clone, 1:25) Chromogen (monosan clone 5H7,1:25) WT1 (novocastra, clone 3F-H2, 1:25) NSE (DAKO, clone BB5/NC/V1-H14, 1:50), CK20 (DAKO, clone Ks20.8, 1:50),CK7 (Zymed 1:25, clone V-TL12/30)were used.

Results

The mean age of the patients was 51.4 years ranging from 16 to 82 years. The tumor was unilateral in 28 cases (16/28 in the right ovary and 12/28 in the left ovary) and bilateral in two cases. Twenty-eight cases (93%) were benign and two (7%) were proliferating (borderline) tumors. Seventeen cases (56%) were pure Brenner tumors, measuring from 0.5 to 2.5 cm and 13 cases (44%) were mixed tumors consisting of a Brenner tumor element and a mucinous ovarian tumor (10/13 cases, 53.8%) and a germ cell tumor in 3/13 cases. The largest diameter of the mixed tumors ranged from 7 to 22 cm. The largest area consisting of Brenner elements measured 7 cm. The immunoprofile of Brenner tumor cell was cytokeratine-7 positive (30/30 cases) cytokeratine-20 negative in the Brenner cell element but positive in the mucinous component in 5/7 cases of mixed Brenner tumors, focally WT-1 positive (5/30 cases), NSE negative (0/30 cases) and focally chromogranine positive (6/30 cases), Uroplakin-III positive in 23/30 cases, with faint cytoplasmatic or luminal distribution. In conclusion, Brenner ovarian tumors are unilateral, small and benign neoplasms in their majority and present specific histopathological and immunopathological characteristics and mixed forms with other epithelial and germ cell neoplasms. This could be explained as a form of metaplasia or a diverse histogenesis from surface epithelium and/or the germ cell ovarian component.

Keywords

Brenner tumors Transitional cell tumors Epithelial ovarian tumors 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kondi-Pafiti
    • 1
  • Evi Kairi-Vassilatou
    • 1
  • Ch. Iavazzo
    • 2
  • Em. Vouza
    • 1
  • P. Mavrigiannaki
    • 1
  • Ch. Kleanthis
    • 1
  • D. Vlahodimitropoulos
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Liapis
    • 2
  1. 1.Pathology LaboratoryAretaieion University Hospital, Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece
  2. 2.2nd Clinic of Obstetrics and GynecologyAretaieion University Hospital, Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece

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