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Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 283, Issue 2, pp 255–260 | Cite as

Effect of cesarean section on the risk of perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus from HCV-RNA+/HIV− mothers: a meta-analysis

  • Mohammad Ebrahim Ghamar Chehreh
  • Seyed Vahid Tabatabaei
  • Shahab Khazanehdari
  • Seyed Moayed AlavianEmail author
General Gynecology

Abstract

Background

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vertical transmission is considered the main route of HCV infection in children. Some authors have stated that cesarean section (C/S) can reduce perinatal HCV transmission. However, the study findings are heterogeneous and high-quality studies are lacking.

Aims

To evaluate the effect of mode of delivery on the risk of perinatal mother-to-infant transmission of HCV.

Methods

Only the peer-reviewed published studies that compared perinatal transmission rate of HCV in elective or emergency cesarean section with vaginal delivery in HCV-RNA+/HIV− mothers were included. We applied the random effect model of DerSimonian and Laird method with heterogeneity and sensitivity analyses.

Results

We identified 8 studies that involved 641 unique mother–infant pairs which fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Aggregation of study results did not show a significant decrease in HCV vertical transmission among study (mothers who underwent C/S) versus control (mothers who gave birth vaginally) patients [pooled odds ratio, 1.1 (95% CI 0.45–2.67)]. The P value was 0.35 for our test of heterogeneity.

Conclusions

Our meta-analysis suggests that C/S does not decrease perinatal HCV transmission from HCV-RNA+/HIV− mothers to infants.

Keywords

Meta-analysis HCV Cesarean section Vaginal delivery Vertical transmission 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest relevant to the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Ebrahim Ghamar Chehreh
    • 1
  • Seyed Vahid Tabatabaei
    • 1
  • Shahab Khazanehdari
    • 1
  • Seyed Moayed Alavian
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Ground floor of Baqiyatallah HospitalBaqiyatallah University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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