Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics

, Volume 280, Issue 2, pp 177–181 | Cite as

Factors associated with bone density in young women with karyotypically normal spontaneous premature ovarian failure

  • Paula Leite-Silva
  • Aloísio Bedone
  • Aarão Mendes Pinto-Neto
  • José Vilton Costa
  • Lúcia Costa-Paiva
Original Article

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate bone density and associated factors in women with premature ovarian failure (POF) compared to age-matched women with normal ovarian function.

Methods

A cross-sectional study of 50 patients with POF undergoing bone mineral densitometry was conducted, compared to 50 women paired by age who menstruated regularly.

Results

In women with POF, the mean bone mineral density measured was 1.22 g/cm2 at the spine and 0.92 g/cm2 at the femur, values which were significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Factors directly associated with bone density of the lumbar spine were age and with bone density of the femur were BMI and reproductive age.

Conclusion

Young women with POF have a decrease in lumbar spine and femoral bone density. Age, reproductive age and BMI were the factors associated with BMD. These women need early investigation and treatment to prevent bone loss and minimize fracture risk in the future.

Keywords

Premature ovarian failure Estrogen deficiency Bone mineral density Bone mass Osteoporosis 

Notes

Conflict of interest statement

None declared.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula Leite-Silva
    • 1
  • Aloísio Bedone
    • 1
  • Aarão Mendes Pinto-Neto
    • 1
  • José Vilton Costa
    • 1
  • Lúcia Costa-Paiva
    • 1
  1. 1.Departament of Obstetrics and GynaecologySchool of Medicine, State University of CampinasCampinasBrazil

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