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Archives of Dermatological Research

, Volume 311, Issue 1, pp 55–62 | Cite as

CXCL12 regulates differentiation of human immature melanocyte precursors as well as their migration

  • Takaaki YamadaEmail author
  • Seiji Hasegawa
  • Yuichi Hasebe
  • Mika Kawagishi-Hotta
  • Masaru Arima
  • Yohei Iwata
  • Tsukane Kobayashi
  • Shigeki Numata
  • Naoki Yamamoto
  • Satoru Nakata
  • Kazumitsu Sugiura
  • Hirohiko Akamatsu
Original Paper
  • 153 Downloads

Abstract

Melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) are localized in the bulge region of hair follicles and supply melanocytes, which determine hair color by synthesizing melanin. Ectopic differentiation of McSCs, which are usually undifferentiated in the bulge region, causes depletion of McSCs and results in hair graying. Therefore, to prevent hair graying, it is essential to maintain McSCs in the bulge region, but the mechanism of McSC maintenance remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the role of CXCL12, a chemokine which was previously suggested to induce migration of melanocyte lineage cells, as a niche component of McSCs. Immunohistological analysis revealed that CXCL12 was highly expressed in the bulge region of human hair follicles. CXCL12 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in white hairs plucked from human scalps than in black hairs. CXCL12 attracted the migration of early-passage normal human epidermal melanocytes (eNHEMs), an in vitro model of McSCs, which had characteristics of immature melanocyte precursors. We also found that CXCL12 suppressed their differentiation. These results suggest that CXCL12 regulates differentiation of McSCs as well as their proper localization, and maintaining McSCs by regulating CXCL12 expression level in the bulge region may be a key to preventing hair graying.

Keywords

Melanocyte stem cell CXCL12 Stem cell niche Differentiation Bulge 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to N. Goshima (Cellisis Co., Ltd., Aichi, Japan) for her support in preparing the manuscript.

Author Contributions

TY and SH designed the research study. TY, MA, YI, TK, SN and NY performed the research. TY, SH, SN, KS and HA carried out the data analysis and wrote the manuscript. All authors critically revised the manuscript and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors state no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takaaki Yamada
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Seiji Hasegawa
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yuichi Hasebe
    • 1
    • 3
  • Mika Kawagishi-Hotta
    • 1
    • 3
  • Masaru Arima
    • 3
  • Yohei Iwata
    • 3
  • Tsukane Kobayashi
    • 3
  • Shigeki Numata
    • 3
  • Naoki Yamamoto
    • 5
    • 6
  • Satoru Nakata
    • 1
  • Kazumitsu Sugiura
    • 3
  • Hirohiko Akamatsu
    • 2
  1. 1.Research LaboratoriesNippon Menard Cosmetic Co., LtdNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Applied Cell and Regenerative MedicineFujita Health University School of MedicineToyoakeJapan
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyFujita Health University School of MedicineToyoakeJapan
  4. 4.Nagoya University-MENARD Collaborative Research ChairNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  5. 5.Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Histochemistry, Joint Research Support Promotion Facility, Center for Research Promotion and SupportFujita Health UniversityToyoakeJapan
  6. 6.Regenerative Medicine Support Promotion Facility, Center for Research Promotion and SupportFujita Health UniversityToyoakeJapan

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