Archives of Dermatological Research

, Volume 305, Issue 1, pp 85–89

Effects of Cervi cornus Colla (deer antler glue) in the reconstruction of a skin equivalent model

  • Jandi Kim
  • Hyo-Soon Jeong
  • Hailan Li
  • Kwang Jin Baek
  • Nyoun Soo Kwon
  • Hye-Young Yun
  • Hye-Ryung Choi
  • Kyoung-Chan Park
  • Dong-Seok Kim
Short Communication

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Cervi cornus Colla (CCC) in the reconstruction of skin equivalent (SE). H&E staining showed that SE containing hyaluronic acid (HA) or HA and CCC had a thicker epidermis than the control SE. Immunohistochemical staining showed that p63 was mainly present at the basal layer of the epidermis in the HA and CCC model. Involucrin was obviously expressed in the upper layer of the epidermis in the HA and CCC model. Moreover, we observed that integrins α6 and β1 were strongly expressed along the basement membrane zone in the HA and CCC model, in which the dermis expressing type I collagen was more compact. In conclusion, our data indicate that CCC contributed to the formation of epidermis, basement membrane, and extracellular matrix in the reconstruction of SE and suggest that CCC may be a useful adjuvant in the reconstruction of SE.

Keywords

Basement membrane Cervi cornus Colla Hyaluronic acid Skin equivalent 

Abbreviations

BM

Basement membrane

CCC

Cervi cornus Colla

ECM

Extracellular matrix

HA

Hyaluronic acid

SE

Skin equivalent

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jandi Kim
    • 1
  • Hyo-Soon Jeong
    • 1
  • Hailan Li
    • 1
  • Kwang Jin Baek
    • 1
  • Nyoun Soo Kwon
    • 1
  • Hye-Young Yun
    • 1
  • Hye-Ryung Choi
    • 2
  • Kyoung-Chan Park
    • 2
  • Dong-Seok Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryChung-Ang University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of DermatologySeoul National University Bundang HospitalKyoungki-doRepublic of Korea

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