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Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

, Volume 119, Issue 7–8, pp 388–393 | Cite as

Posterior rotational osteotomy for the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis

  • T. Atsumi
  • M. Muraki
  • S. Yoshihara
  • T. Kajihara
Original article

Abstract

Posterior rotational osteotomy in 46 hips of 39 patients with femoral head osteonecrosis was reviewed radiographically and clinically after 2–12 years of follow-up (mean 5 years). The age of the patients at the time of surgery ranged from 18 to 60 years, with a mean of 35 years. There were 18 women and 21 men. The cause of the osteonecrosis was steroid administration in 14, alcohol abuse in 5, trauma in 16, and no apparent risk factor in 4. According to the Ficat staging system, 2 hips were stage II, 30 hips III, and 14 hips stage IV. All hips had an extensive lesion. Forty-one hips showed less than 1/3 noncollapsed posterior living area, which was a contraindication for traditional anterior rotational osteotomy. The posterior rotational angle was 60–180 deg with an mean of 127 deg. Recollapse of the final follow-up anteroposterior radiograph was prevented in 36 hips (78%). Progressive joint space narrowing was found in 12 hips (26%). Of these hips, 9 suffered recollapse, while the remaining 3 hips did not. Clinically, 32 hips (70%) showed excellent or good results (both hips in stage II, 23 of 30 hips in stage III, 7 of 14 hips in stage IV. A fair or poor result was seen in 14 hips (30%)). These results suggest that posterior rotational osteotomy is effective in delaying the progression of degeneration for large necrotic lesions, especially in young patients. Extent of rotation is limited to 150 deg because of limitations of bone quality. The indications should be refined further, and longer term follow-up is necessary.

Keywords

Alcohol Abuse Joint Space Osteonecrosis Bone Quality Necrotic Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Atsumi
    • 1
  • M. Muraki
    • 1
  • S. Yoshihara
    • 1
  • T. Kajihara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fujigaoka Hospital, Showa University School of Medicine, 1–30 Fujigaoka Aobaku, Yokohama 227–8501, Japan Tel.: +81-459711151 Fax: +81-459713773JP

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