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Acta Neuropathologica

, Volume 94, Issue 5, pp 471–478 | Cite as

Lack of correlation between plaque burden and cognition in the aged monkey

  • J. A. Sloane
  • M. F. Pietropaolo
  • D. L. Rosene
  • M. B. Moss
  • A. Peters
  • T. Kemper
  • C. R. Abraham
Regular paper

Abstract

To assess whether amyloid plaque accumulation in the monkey brain can account for age-related cognitive impairment that begins at about 20 years of age, we measured plaque content in the brains of 14 rhesus monkeys aged 5–30 years. We used immunohistochemistry employing the monoclonal antibody 6E10, which is specific to amino acids 1–17 of the amyloid β peptide to identify amyloid plaques in serial coronal sections of the forebrain. Amyloid plaques accumulate with age, starting at 25 years of age and escalating after 30 years. Until the age of 30, plaques are only found in a few monkeys and are relatively sparse. Results from our group and others show that plaque content and the proportion of individuals afflicted with amyloid plaques increase with age. Although both cognitive dysfunction and plaque content increase with age, amyloid plaque content does not correlate with the cognitive dysfunction observed in elderly monkeys since even in very old subjects some cognitively impaired animals have few amyloid plaques and others with abundant plaques show only minor cognitive impairments. In summary, amyloid plaques appear to accumulate significantly only in monkeys over 25 years of age but do not appear to be a causal factor in age-related cognitive decline of the normal aging rhesus monkey.

Key words Aging Rhesus Macaca mulatta 6E10 Amyloid 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Sloane
    • 1
  • M. F. Pietropaolo
    • 2
  • D. L. Rosene
    • 4
  • M. B. Moss
    • 3
  • A. Peters
    • 4
  • T. Kemper
    • 3
  • C. R. Abraham
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 80 E. Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, 80 E. Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA Tel.: 1-617-638-4308; Fax: 1-617-638-5226; e-mail: cabraham@bu.eduUS
  3. 3.Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, 80 E. Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USAUS
  4. 4.Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 80 E. Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USAUS

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